Matthew LaPlante

Matthew LaPlante has reported on ritual infanticide in Northern Africa, insurgent warfare in the Middle East, the legacy of genocide in Southeast Asia, and gang violence in Central America. But a few years back, something donned on him: Maybe the news doesn't have to be brutally depressing all the time. Today, he balances his continuing work on more heartbreaking subjects by writing books about the intersection of science, human health and society, including Inheritance with geneticist Sharon Moalem and the Nautilus Award-winning Longevity Plan with cardiologist John Day. His forthcoming book, Superlative, will look at what scientists are learning by studying organisms that have evolved in record-setting ways. 

LaPlante is host of the science show Undisciplined, heard on Utah Public Radio every Friday at 2:00 p.m.

University of Utah

Clement Chow studies how—and why—two people can get the same disease and have very different outcomes. Josh Tewksbury's research team has developed a model indicating how human-caused climate change stands to make insects much hungrier. Together, we'll try and build some bridges between those two very different areas of research.

Utah State University - Michel Kohl

Shefali Patil's recent studies have offered surprising insights into the way law enforcement officers see their jobs. Dan MacNulty's work seeks to understand the way animals interact in Yellowstone National Park. Together, we'll talk about police and predators. 

PBS

Erik Peper's recent studies have investigated the ways posture can affect performance. Brady Mattsson's recent work examines how natural resource officials can best share their expertise and experiences in managing protected areas. Together, we'll talk about the ways we manage our bodies, our minds and our environments.

Bipolar Network News

Ana Clara Bobadilla is a behavioral neuroscientist who discovered how a molecule may be able to help public health workers help people experiencing cocaine addiction. Rachael Kaspar is an evolutionary biologist who studies how bees work together to cool their hives. Together, we'll talk about bees and rats, and what we can learn about ourselves from both.

The Ohio State University

Gabriele Ciciurkaite studies the impact of food insecurity on mental health. Melissa Wrzesien investigates new ways to measure snowpacks. Together, we talk about how decision-making impacts resource allocation.

National Geographic

Ellada Gamreklidze examines the ways in which the views of members of the Supreme Court move through time.

Blaine Giriffen studies how polar bears move through water.

Together, we’ll discuss the ways in which old data can offer new clues about our world.

Trolls (2016)

Amanda Subalusky studies how ecosystems are impacted by migrating wildebeests in Africa. Candi Carter Olson's research focuses on how communities of interest use the media to get their messages heard. Together, we talk about gnus and the news.

On The Streets Of New York

James Cutting studies the way moviemakers exploit human emotions to tell stories. Zach Gompert examines fundamental questions about evolutionary genetics. Together, we talk about how things change over time and whether we can predict those changes.

ScienceNews.Org

Marlena Fejzo's research has suggested a genetic cause for morning sickness. Jared Martin's recent work demonstrates that not all smiles are created equal. In this episode, we talk about what's happening deep inside of us when we feel feelings.

SpaceX

Anna Cohen uses pulsed lasers to map ancient cities. David Geller works to identify space junk to prevent catastrophic orbital collisions. Together, we talk about how to best encourage young people to become scientific explorers. 

Utah State University

 

Yesola Kweon's recent work evaluates the ways in which government salary raises impact corruption. Bruce Bugbee has been researching ways to grow plants in space for more than 30 years. Together, we discuss the importance of "rethinking" in research. 

Karen Beard's most recent study showed a fascinating association between non-native species in Hawaii. Veronica Pozo's recent work demonstrates a frightening connection between social media and police violence. In this episode we discuss how to avoid looking for simple answers to complex problems.

Matthew LaPlante, host of Undisciplined, the new science show produced at Utah Public Radio, says “the scientific world is supposed to be a place where ideas come together. Instead, it’s often a place full of really brilliant people who don’t talk to each other.” 

Undisciplined is designed to break down those barriers.