Behind the Headlines

Friday's from 9 a.m - 10 a.m.
  • Hosted by , Roger McDonough

  From its politics to its public lands to polygamy, Utah has always been fertile ground for news. Here on UPR, The Salt Lake Tribune presents a fresh way for Utahns to process the headlines. Behind the Headlines, a live weekly broadcast, examines the week’s top local stories through the eyes of reporters on the beat.

KCPW's producer and news host Roger McDonough and a rotating panel of the state’s top journalists – including columnist Paul Rolly, investigative reporter Matt Canham, senior government reporter Robert Gehrke, reporter Kathy Stephenson and others – will talk about what’s happening in the Beehive State along with the hows and whys.

Listeners can join the discussion by sending questions to #TribTalk on Twitter, Google+, commenting on sltrib.com or calling (801) 355-TALK.

LDS Church News

The November election ballots hit mailboxes this week, with 27 of Utah's 29 counties voting primarily by mail. Plus, comments by Latter-day Saint leader Dallin H. Oaks about the LGBTQ community stir up controversy. And President Donald Trump's approval rating in Utah keeps falling.   

KUER

Opponents and advocates of the Proposition 2 ballot initiative reach a  "shared vision" on medical marijuana legislation. Utah power brokers, including Utah Jazz owner Gail Miller, spend big money on ballot initiatives in the state. And Salt Lake City moves to rein in the environmental impacts of the inland port. 

Salt Lake Tribune

Utah leaders respond to the Senate hearings over sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Also, Prof. Anita Hill, who testified in remarkably similar hearings held 27 years ago, visits the University of Utah for a lecture on sexual harassment. And the LDS Church, House Speaker Greg Hughes and proponents of legalizing medical cannabis meet to draft medical marijuana legislation, should Proposition 2 fail in November or Gov. Gary Herbert call a special session.

Salt Lake Tribune

Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski says lawsuits are coming on the inland port because she believes the legislation that created it is unconstitutional. A Vernal detective walks a delicate line between enforcement and entrapment in sexual solicitation arrests. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints excommunicates a former LDS bishop who has been critical of one-on-one interviews between Mormon clergy and youths. And one of Elizabeth Smart's kidnappers is freed from prison. 

Deseret News

The Federal Election Commission raises questions about more than a million dollars in campaign donations brought in by Rep. Mia Love. Sensitive areas near Canyonlands National Park are auctioned off as part of the largest oil and gas BLM lease sale since the George W. Bush administration. Plus, Tribune reporter Kathy Stephenson talks with KCPW producer Emily Means about health code violations and foodborne-illness outbreaks at restaurants, after an estimated 650 diners at The New Yorker may have been exposed to hepatitis a. 

Fox 10 Phoenix

Senators Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee question Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh during contentious confirmation hearings. The race for Utah's Fourth Congressional District takes a negative turn, with Rep. Mia Love and Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams' recently launched campaign ads. And commercials attacking a medical marijuana ballot initiative are pulled from local airwaves following complaints that they were misleading. 

Salt Lake Tribune

Members of the local Kingston polygamist group are indicted in a $500 million tax-credit scheme, raising questions about a $50,000 campaign donation to Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes. Also, a spotlight on the safety of Mormon missionaries, after sexual assault survivors take their case to the Church. And the Inland Port Authority board votes to keep its subcommittee meetings closed to the public. 

Salt Lake Tribune

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints opposes Utah's medical marijuana ballot initiative, but not the use of the drug under specific circumstances. Sen. Orrin Hatch and Rep. Chris Stewart respond to news about former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen. And though legal, private meetings held by subcommittees of the Inland Port Authority draw more criticism from the public over a lack of transparency. 

Salt Lake Tribune

After its first year of implementation, how has Operation Rio Grande impacted crime and homelessness in Salt Lake City? The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints requests a shift away from the terms 'LDS' and 'Mormon.' Also, opponents to Utah's medical marijuana ballot initiative argue against it on the basis of religious freedom. And the absence of a tiny star on driver licenses may affect Utahns' ability to travel. 

Quartz

A judge rules that San Juan County Commission candidate Willy Grayeyes be put back on the ballot after an elections official backdated a complaint against him. U.S.

Conservative Review

The Inland Port Authority has its first real meeting, where one board member asks for 

KSL TV

A loaded gun was left in a bathroom at the Living Planet Aquarium, where the property has a posted ban on weapons, but Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill says no law was broken.

The Palm Beach Post

Student survivors of the Parkland, Fla. school shooting lose the venue for their Utah rally. Vicky Chavez, a woman from Honduras who came to the U.S. seeking asylum, loses an appeal to have her case reconsidered by the courts. She says she'll keep trying, while she and her daughters remain sheltered at the local church that has housed them since January. And how quickly are Utah judges signing off on search warrants for law enforcement?

 

Wikipedia

With Justice Anthony Kennedy retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court, Utah Sen. Mike Lee, and his brother, Thomas, are mentioned as possible replacements. A Utah judge fines the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. And Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes steps down from his self-appointed position on the Inland Port Authority Board.  

Wikipedia

Utah's religious and political leaders respond to the Trump administration's initial policy of separating families at the borders. Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes owns land close to the boundaries of the proposed inland port, which appears to disqualify him from the board he appointed himself to. And in San Juan County, a Navajo candidate files a lawsuit challenging the county's decision to disqualify him from the ballot. 

Francisco Kjolseth / The Salt Lake Tribune

The Salt Lake City council forbids Mayor Jackie Biskupski from suing over the inland port deal--unless she gets their permission first. The Provo Freedom Festival enacts a nondiscrimination policy, initially rejects all LGBTQ entries, and finally admits LGBTQ groups into the parade after meeting with them. And a former police detective sues the department that fired her, saying she was axed in retaliation for whistleblowing on a Salt Lake County Attorney. 

Salt Lake Tribune

Two Utah lawmakers unveil their ideas for bridging a divide between Salt Lake City and the state over the planned Inland Port. A mob shouting homophobic slurs chases four men leaving the Utah Pride Festival, until a dessert shop employee intervenes. And ozone pollution season arrives earlier than usual in northern Utah.

At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporters Erin Alberty, Taylor Anderson and Courtney Tanner and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

Time

After spending nearly two years in a Venezuelan prison, Josh Holt and his wife arrive home in the Beehive State. A final certification shows that three of four citizen initiatives are on their way to the November ballot. And Facebook plans to put a data center in Eagle Mountain, enticed by a $150 million tax break.

 At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune Washington bureau chief Thomas Burr, government and politics editor Dan Harrie and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Utah authors band together to criticize the founders of the FanX convention for their response to sexual harassment allegations. At its State Central Committee meeting, the Utah Republican Party removes some of its women and minority members, and also elects a new vice chairperson. And, in an historic meeting, LDS Church leaders get together with officials of the NAACP to collaborate on humanitarian and education efforts.

The Salt Lake Tribune

      The Salt Lake Tribune lays off a third of its staff, after publisher Paul Huntsman announces a steep decline in revenue since purchasing the paper in 2016. The Utah County Clerk's office fails to count more than 100 packets of petition signatures for the Count My Vote ballot initiative. And San Juan County Commission candidate Willie Grayeyes, a democrat and Navajo, is booted from the ballot.  

Voice of Scouting

 An invasive plant makes the jump from Salt Lake City gardens to the surrounding foothills. Deer ticks carrying lyme disease rear their heads more frequently in Utah due to climate change. And after more than a century, The LDS Church and the Boy Scouts of America begin to part ways. 

 

Trinity Consultants

The EPA gives Utah three years to bring its ozone pollution down to acceptable levels. A new center aims to honor the legacy of Sen. Orrin Hatch. And a Utah police officer, who sought help after years of personal trauma, is now working to get other officers to do the same. 

 

GENE SWEENEY JR. / GETTY IMAGES

 

State Rep. Mike Kennedy, R-Alpine, bested Mitt Romney in the Republican convention last weekend and will face off with him in the primary election. The tension between conservative and moderate Republicans also played out at the convention. And the Utah Jazz gear up for Game 6 against the Oklahoma City Thunder. 

 

Standard Examiner

The ongoing power struggle continues as the Utah state legislature overrides two of Gov. Gary Herbert's vetoes. Four of six citizen initiatives will likely end up on the ballot in November, including one to expand Medicaid and another to legalize medical marijuana.

And San Juan County claims a right of way through Recapture Canyon, the site of ancient archaeological ruins and of a 2014 protest ATV ride.

The Journal

At their convention, San Juan County Republicans express deep frustration over recently redrawn voting district boundaries that give the county's majority Navajo population a greater say at the ballot box. Salt Lake County sues pharmaceutical companies over the opioid crisis, while the state of Utah debates doing the same. And after turning their season around, the Utah Jazz are headed to the playoffs. 

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