Behind the Headlines

Deseret News

The Federal Election Commission raises questions about more than a million dollars in campaign donations brought in by Rep. Mia Love. Sensitive areas near Canyonlands National Park are auctioned off as part of the largest oil and gas BLM lease sale since the George W. Bush administration. Plus, Tribune reporter Kathy Stephenson talks with KCPW producer Emily Means about health code violations and foodborne-illness outbreaks at restaurants, after an estimated 650 diners at The New Yorker may have been exposed to hepatitis a. 

Fox 10 Phoenix

Senators Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee question Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh during contentious confirmation hearings. The race for Utah's Fourth Congressional District takes a negative turn, with Rep. Mia Love and Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams' recently launched campaign ads. And commercials attacking a medical marijuana ballot initiative are pulled from local airwaves following complaints that they were misleading. 

Salt Lake Tribune

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints opposes Utah's medical marijuana ballot initiative, but not the use of the drug under specific circumstances. Sen. Orrin Hatch and Rep. Chris Stewart respond to news about former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen. And though legal, private meetings held by subcommittees of the Inland Port Authority draw more criticism from the public over a lack of transparency. 

Quartz

A judge rules that San Juan County Commission candidate Willy Grayeyes be put back on the ballot after an elections official backdated a complaint against him. U.S.

KSL TV

A loaded gun was left in a bathroom at the Living Planet Aquarium, where the property has a posted ban on weapons, but Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill says no law was broken.

The Palm Beach Post

Student survivors of the Parkland, Fla. school shooting lose the venue for their Utah rally. Vicky Chavez, a woman from Honduras who came to the U.S. seeking asylum, loses an appeal to have her case reconsidered by the courts. She says she'll keep trying, while she and her daughters remain sheltered at the local church that has housed them since January. And how quickly are Utah judges signing off on search warrants for law enforcement?

 

Wikipedia

Utah's religious and political leaders respond to the Trump administration's initial policy of separating families at the borders. Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes owns land close to the boundaries of the proposed inland port, which appears to disqualify him from the board he appointed himself to. And in San Juan County, a Navajo candidate files a lawsuit challenging the county's decision to disqualify him from the ballot. 

Francisco Kjolseth / The Salt Lake Tribune

The Salt Lake City council forbids Mayor Jackie Biskupski from suing over the inland port deal--unless she gets their permission first. The Provo Freedom Festival enacts a nondiscrimination policy, initially rejects all LGBTQ entries, and finally admits LGBTQ groups into the parade after meeting with them. And a former police detective sues the department that fired her, saying she was axed in retaliation for whistleblowing on a Salt Lake County Attorney. 

Salt Lake Tribune

Two Utah lawmakers unveil their ideas for bridging a divide between Salt Lake City and the state over the planned Inland Port. A mob shouting homophobic slurs chases four men leaving the Utah Pride Festival, until a dessert shop employee intervenes. And ozone pollution season arrives earlier than usual in northern Utah.

At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporters Erin Alberty, Taylor Anderson and Courtney Tanner and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

Time

After spending nearly two years in a Venezuelan prison, Josh Holt and his wife arrive home in the Beehive State. A final certification shows that three of four citizen initiatives are on their way to the November ballot. And Facebook plans to put a data center in Eagle Mountain, enticed by a $150 million tax break.

 At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune Washington bureau chief Thomas Burr, government and politics editor Dan Harrie and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Utah authors band together to criticize the founders of the FanX convention for their response to sexual harassment allegations. At its State Central Committee meeting, the Utah Republican Party removes some of its women and minority members, and also elects a new vice chairperson. And, in an historic meeting, LDS Church leaders get together with officials of the NAACP to collaborate on humanitarian and education efforts.

The Salt Lake Tribune

      The Salt Lake Tribune lays off a third of its staff, after publisher Paul Huntsman announces a steep decline in revenue since purchasing the paper in 2016. The Utah County Clerk's office fails to count more than 100 packets of petition signatures for the Count My Vote ballot initiative. And San Juan County Commission candidate Willie Grayeyes, a democrat and Navajo, is booted from the ballot.  

Voice of Scouting

 An invasive plant makes the jump from Salt Lake City gardens to the surrounding foothills. Deer ticks carrying lyme disease rear their heads more frequently in Utah due to climate change. And after more than a century, The LDS Church and the Boy Scouts of America begin to part ways. 

 

Trinity Consultants

The EPA gives Utah three years to bring its ozone pollution down to acceptable levels. A new center aims to honor the legacy of Sen. Orrin Hatch. And a Utah police officer, who sought help after years of personal trauma, is now working to get other officers to do the same. 

 

Standard Examiner

The ongoing power struggle continues as the Utah state legislature overrides two of Gov. Gary Herbert's vetoes. Four of six citizen initiatives will likely end up on the ballot in November, including one to expand Medicaid and another to legalize medical marijuana.

And San Juan County claims a right of way through Recapture Canyon, the site of ancient archaeological ruins and of a 2014 protest ATV ride.

The Journal

At their convention, San Juan County Republicans express deep frustration over recently redrawn voting district boundaries that give the county's majority Navajo population a greater say at the ballot box. Salt Lake County sues pharmaceutical companies over the opioid crisis, while the state of Utah debates doing the same. And after turning their season around, the Utah Jazz are headed to the playoffs. 

christiandaily.com

The woman who says she was raped by a Missionary Training Center president sues the LDS Church and comes forward to tell her story. The state of Utah asks for control of unclaimed water in Bear Lake, prompting concerns from environmentalists about downstream effects. And how Salt Lake City's priorities for an inland port were pushed aside during this year's legislative session. 

MSNBC

Mitt Romney takes a hard stance on Dreamers and suggests a merit-based U.S. immigration system. Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signs a Medicaid expansion bill that will cover 70,000 needy Utahns, if the federal government approves it. And a look back at this past weekend's student-led march against gun violence as well as the counter demonstration by gun rights activists.  

 

Business Insider

Utah Congressman John Curtis is accused of ignoring sexual harassment allegations against his chief of police while he was Mayor of Provo. State Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, gets flack for not disclosing how he could benefit from the Lake Powell Pipeline project he advocated for in the legislature. And a number of Utahns are deciding whether or not to break ties with Facebook, as a global movement to delete accounts gains steam. 

KUTV

Thousands of Utah high school students walked out of their classrooms Wednesday in protest of gun violence. We get the reaction to that, as well as the reaction to the many Utah legislators who announced they will not be running for reelection. All of this and more on this edition of Behind The Headlines. 

At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporters Lee Davidson and Benjamin Wood, and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to reflect on the session and talk about the week’s top stories.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Utah state senators pass a bill to overhaul the Utah Transit Authority, starting with its name. The Utah House votes to require state universities to share allegations of sexual assault with police, regardless of the survivors' wishes. And state officials plan an inland port in Salt Lake City's Northwest Quadrant, but the city expected to have greater input in that decision.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Today on the program, we're discussing the possibility of Utah doing away with the death penalty and as Mitt Romney begins his campaign for Senate, his relationship with Pres. Donald Trump appears to warm.  Huntsville Republican Rep. Gage Froerer leads the charge to do away with the death penalty, and he has some powerful players backing him. And state lawmakers seem to have an extra $209 million to work with in the budget this year. 

Deseret News

The latest attempt to strengthen Utah's hate crime laws at the State Legislature dies without even getting a hearing. Although science points to the burning of fossil fuels as a driver of climate change, Utah lawmakers refuse to acknowledge the concept. And Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, who advocated for a reduction to Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, failed to disclose that he owned land within the monument. 

Salt Lake Tribune

St. George Republican Rep. Jon Stanard abruptly resigns from office, citing a desire to spend time with his ailing father. But soon after the announcement, allegations that he paid a prostitute for sex surface. Rob Porter, a Trump administration official with ties to Utah's senators, quits after his ex-wives accuse him of physical abuse. And the Utah House advances a $1.72 million tax break proposal for EnergySolutions, a radioactive waste company. 

The Salt Lake Tribune

On the eve of her scheduled deportation, a young mother and her two children find sanctuary at the Unitarian Church in Salt Lake City. The cost of moving the state prison is turning out to be more than lawmakers originally told the public, as the price tag nears $700 million. And the state spent $33 million to file an unfinished application for the Lake Powell pipeline. 

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