Environment

religiousstudies.usu.edu

Today we're speaking with Margaret Barker, Dr. David Haberman, and Anuttama Dasa, panelists at the conference God & Smog:  The Challenge of Preserving Our Planet. The conference is taking place today in the USU John M. Huntsman School of Business Perry Pavilion until 5 p.m.  The one-day symposium will consider the environment in relation to the perspectives and actions of five religious traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Mormonism, and Native American traditions.

USU English Department

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Dr. Lynne McNeill, assistant professor of English at Utah State University. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program. We’ll hear a segment from our conversation on Slender Man, with Amanda Brennan, Dr. Elizabeth Tucker, and Dr. Trevor J.

Amazon

Part elegy, part ode, part investigative science journalism, Jonathan Thompson’s new book “River of Lost Souls: The Science, Politics, and Greed Behind the Gold King Mine Disaster” (Torrey House Press), tells the gripping story behind the 2015 Gold King Mine disaster that turned the Animas River in southwestern Colorado orange with sludge and toxic metals for more than 100 miles downstream, wreaking havoc on cities, farms, and the Navajo Nation along the way.

HarperCollins Publishers

Earl Swift began writing for a living in his teens. In the years since, the Virginia-based journalist has penned seven books and hundreds of major features for newspapers and magazines, and has earned a reputation for fast-moving narrative and scrupulous reporting. His editors have nominated his work for the National Book Award, the National Magazine Award, and six times for a Pulitzer Prize.

Town Hall Seattle

Gary Paul Nabhan is an Agricultural Ecologist, Ethnobotanist, Ecumenical Franciscan Brother, and author whose work has focused primarily on the interaction of biodiversity and cultural diversity of the arid binational Southwest. He is considered a pioneer in the local food movement and the heirloom seed saving movement.

 

Amazon

After water and air, sand is the natural resource that we consume more than any other--even more than oil. Every concrete building and paved road on Earth, every computer screen and silicon chip, is made from sand. From Egypt's pyramids to the Hubble telescope, from the world's tallest skyscraper to the sidewalk below it, from Chartres' stained-glass windows to your iPhone, sand shelters us, empowers us, engages us, and inspires us. It's the ingredient that makes possible our cities, our science, our lives--and our future.

And, incredibly, we're running out of it. 

NPR

The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from Colorado's headwaters, to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. He takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and rv parks, to the spot near the U.S.-Mexico border where the river runs dry.

KSL TV

A loaded gun was left in a bathroom at the Living Planet Aquarium, where the property has a posted ban on weapons, but Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill says no law was broken.

Daily Express

Volcanoes have been much in the news of late, with eruptions in Hawaii, Guatemala, and most recently, in Bali. You may know that Yellowstone National Park sits on a “supervolcano,” 44 miles wide. An eruption of this caldera volcano, as scientists call it, is very unlikely, but potentially catastrophic. We’ll talk about volcanoes in general and the Yellowstone supervolcano specifically today.

Salt Lake Tribune

Two Utah lawmakers unveil their ideas for bridging a divide between Salt Lake City and the state over the planned Inland Port. A mob shouting homophobic slurs chases four men leaving the Utah Pride Festival, until a dessert shop employee intervenes. And ozone pollution season arrives earlier than usual in northern Utah.

At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporters Erin Alberty, Taylor Anderson and Courtney Tanner and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

Western Watersheds Logo and watershed valley project.
westernwatershed.org

Environmental groups are suing the Trump administration for selling oil and gas leases on huge swaths of Western U.S. public lands while allegedly ignoring policies meant to protect an imperiled bird.

The lawsuit filed Monday in U.S. District Court seeks to reverse lease sales across 475 square miles (1,230 square kilometers) in Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Nevada.

Man cleaning trash out of the Jordan River.
westsidemedia.org

A device called a "trash boom" is being installed on the Jordan River to help skim off massive amounts of flowing garbage and debris.

The device unveiled on Monday is meant to prevent the garbage from reaching open waters, sensitive wetlands and bird habitat of the Great Salt Lake. The lake provides critical migratory habitat for thousands of waterfowl. But it's also a terminal lake, meaning it is a collection point for most of the runoff from surrounding mountains.

'Journey North' on Wild About Utah

Mar 2, 2018
Citizen-scientist in yard
USGS

To those who take personal pride in their yard, park, field, or community you could become part of an amazing network called Journey North.  This is a free, extremely easy Citizen-Science online activity that people can simply enjoy, or enter data about their own backyard and join over 80,000 other people and schools that participate regularly.

ca.gov

Utah lawmakers on Friday rejected a proposal to add a fee to plastic or paper bags in the state, and advanced a measure to prevent local governments from taking their own action to curb the use of plastic bags. 

Our Winterless Winter on Wild About Utah

Feb 20, 2018
NOAA

Our winterless winter. I’ve been in this lovely valley over 30 years and have never experienced such a balmy January, and now February. The thaw began January first and never ended. As an avid cross country skier, I fear my days of low elevation skiing have ended over a month early.

Winter bird sightings in Utah
Wikimedia Commons

The Great Backyard Bird Count takes place every February. One of the key differences between this event and the Christmas Bird Count, is that the Great Backyard Bird Count is global and may capture some of those early migrants returning for the Spring.

usgs.gov

Utah lawmakers want the state to set aside $2 million to sue California over rules that make coal-fired power more expensive.

The proposal from Republican Rep. Mike Noel passed through a subcommittee Tuesday with only one Democratic lawmaker raising any objections. Noel says California's policy is hurting coal miners in his rural district and violates the U.S. Constitution's Commerce Clause.

Colorado River, a key water source in the western united states, is expected to flow at only half of it's average volume.
americanrivers.org

The first forecast of the year for Colorado River water supplies is a bleak one.

The river that serves as a key source of water for seven states including California, Colorado, Utah and Nevada is expected to flow at only about 54 percent of its average volume during the key runoff period from April to July.

The National Weather Service's Colorado Basin River Forecast Center in Salt Lake City released a report Wednesday showing December snow totals as low as 20 percent of average in some areas.

gousoe.uen.org

A dirty layer of winter air is hovering over many northern Utah cities as an inversion sets in that is expected to last for days, if not weeks.

National Weather Service meteorologist Pete Wilensky said Friday that a high-pressure system over much of the U.S. West is leading to the murky winter air that causes problems for people with asthma and other respiratory illnesses.

Preventing Allergic Asthma Starts In Your Home

Nov 17, 2017
consumerreports.org

Spring is often associated with the flare up of allergies but during the holiday season, people can experience intense asthma symptoms. According to experts, there are ways to solve this problem instead of just treating the symptoms. 

Ozone levels along the Wasatch Front are the worst they've been in almost a decade. A $10 million donation from the Charles Koch Foundation has some University of Utah faculty concerned about potential political influence at the school. And after a judge ruled in the party's favor, Jim Bennett will be on the ballot as the new United Utah Party's candidate for the upcoming special election in the state's Third Congressional District.

gousoe.uen.org

A report predicts an area between Salt Lake City and Provo could face major highway congestion, a lack of affordable housing options and an increase in poor air quality by 2050.

A planning group warned the Point of the Mountain Development Commission on Thursday that the area surrounding Utah's aging state prison would not draw in high-tech businesses and jobs if current trends, population growth and practices continue.

Justin Prather

Thursday the Clean Air Caucus, composed of Republicans and Democrats from Utah’s House and Senate, met to discuss statewide air quality concerns and legislation proposed to address the issue. 

Can a Face Mask Protect You From Air Pollution?

Jan 19, 2017

  

Air pollution is a complicated problem without a simple solution. But have you ever wondered what you can do to protect your health on bad air days? Scientists suggest a mask.

Bad Air Day? Try a Mask.

May 10, 2016

Air pollution is a complicated problem without a simple solution. But have you ever wondered what you can do to protect your health on bad air days? Scientists suggest a mask.

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