Science

From physics to social studies, and paleontology to computers, science is important to our everyday lives. This page is a collection of such topics and stories.

University of Utah

Clement Chow studies how—and why—two people can get the same disease and have very different outcomes. Josh Tewksbury's research team has developed a model indicating how human-caused climate change stands to make insects much hungrier. Together, we'll try and build some bridges between those two very different areas of research.

USU English Department

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Dr. Lynne McNeill, assistant professor of English at Utah State University. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program. We’ll hear a segment from our conversation on Slender Man, with Amanda Brennan, Dr. Elizabeth Tucker, and Dr. Trevor J.

Bipolar Network News

Ana Clara Bobadilla is a behavioral neuroscientist who discovered how a molecule may be able to help public health workers help people experiencing cocaine addiction. Rachael Kaspar is an evolutionary biologist who studies how bees work together to cool their hives. Together, we'll talk about bees and rats, and what we can learn about ourselves from both.

On The Streets Of New York

James Cutting studies the way moviemakers exploit human emotions to tell stories. Zach Gompert examines fundamental questions about evolutionary genetics. Together, we talk about how things change over time and whether we can predict those changes.

Close up of honey bee on purple aster flower with yellow center.
John Severns/Wikipedia Commons

The biblical tale says Noah rescued species from the flood by building an ark and loading it with a male and female of each species. In modern conservation, a literal ark won’t work. But USU scientists have determined a method that could help protect threatened species.

mkaku.org

Physicist and futurist Michio Kaku says that moving human civilization to the stars, formerly the domain of fiction, is increasingly becoming a scientific possibility–and a necessity.

ScienceNews.Org

Marlena Fejzo's research has suggested a genetic cause for morning sickness. Jared Martin's recent work demonstrates that not all smiles are created equal. In this episode, we talk about what's happening deep inside of us when we feel feelings.

SpaceX

Anna Cohen uses pulsed lasers to map ancient cities. David Geller works to identify space junk to prevent catastrophic orbital collisions. Together, we talk about how to best encourage young people to become scientific explorers. 

Cache Valley Daily

Kip Stephen Thorne (born June 1, 1940) is an American theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate, known for his contributions in gravitational physics and astrophysics. A longtime friend and colleague of Stephen Hawking and Carl Sagan, he was the Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) until 2009 and is one of the world's leading experts on the astrophysical implications of Einstein's general theory of relativity.

Utah State University

 

Yesola Kweon's recent work evaluates the ways in which government salary raises impact corruption. Bruce Bugbee has been researching ways to grow plants in space for more than 30 years. Together, we discuss the importance of "rethinking" in research. 

Wikipedia

Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. We’ve lost 50% of the world’s coral in the last 30 years. Scientists say that climate change is now their greatest threat and it is estimated that only 10% can survive past 2050. In a new documentary film, “Chasing Coral,” a team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why coral are vanishing and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.

A black magnet levitates slightly above a clear dish which sits on top of a block of liquid nitrogen.
Wikipedia

Researchers at the University of Utah made a break-through discovery about superconductivity properties of metals using tiny wires. This could help reduce the amount of heat produced by equipment such as computers. 

Karen Beard's most recent study showed a fascinating association between non-native species in Hawaii. Veronica Pozo's recent work demonstrates a frightening connection between social media and police violence. In this episode we discuss how to avoid looking for simple answers to complex problems.

500 Women

Following the November 2016 presidential election, four women wrote an open letter calling for nation-wide equality. Those women hoped to get 500 signatures. Today, over 20,000 people have signed on and created the organization 500 Women Scientists

“In the scientific community his work will be recognized for a very, very long time,” Perry said. “I would imagine that in a thousand years’ time his name will still be known.”
blogs.scientificamerican.com

Scientist Stephen Hawking was known for his groundbreaking work with black holes and relativity. He passed away March 14, 2018, at the age of 76, but his legacy as a pioneer and a friend lives on. UPR’s Bronson Teichert spoke with Malcolm Perry, a professor at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and close friend of Stephen Hawking.

Lewis is the only Caltech Beaver to win titles at different weight classes 126 and 137 lbs.
Randy Lewis

One Utah State University researcher who is used to being recognized for his pioneering as a scientist is now being recognized for his success as an athlete. Utah’s “spider-silk man” will travel from Logan to California for the honors.

Smith and Garrett successfully transplanted a type IV CRISPR immune system into E. coli.
Mary-Ann Muffoletto/USU College of Science.

In the Jackson lab at Utah State University, mixers whirr, protein purification machines beep, and shakers jiggle, all with one goal: isolating and describing the bacterial immune systems known as CRISPR.

T. cristinae comes in three colors:  green, green-striped, and brown.
Aaron Comeault / University of North Carolina

If you spend enough time poking around bushes in California, Nevada or Arizona, you’ll find stick insects, long little guys that blend in with sticks or leaves. Sometimes you only notice them when they drop out of their camouflaged environment and onto your shirt. They’re funny looking, harmless and at the center of a recent high-impact study at Utah State University describing when and how you can predict evolution.

Noctural, flightless, and solitary, kakapo are one of the most evolutionarily distinct parrots
Mnolf / Wikimedia

It’s easy to care about the wellbeing of the threatened giant panda because they’re cute.  But it’s hard to care about the critically endangered Chinese giant salamander, because they look like an enormous booger. 

Idaho National Laboratory/Flickr

Idaho lawmakers are holding public hearings Thursday and Friday on proposed science standards for Idaho public schools. 

At issue: how, or whether, those standards should address climate change. 

Photo by Ron Nichols / USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Cattle digest their food through bacteria-aided fermentation, creating methane as a byproduct that’s exhaled by the animal. According to research by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the cattle industry accounts for about 20 percent of total human-associated methane emissions.

Utah's Native Bees Are Diverse In Traits And Species

Jan 11, 2018
Perdita spp. and Xylocopa spp.
Joseph S Wilson / Utah State University

In a recent survey at Utah State University, 99 percent of people described bees as either critical or important. The pollination services provided by bees are crucial for the survival of entire ecosystems. 

Scientists Make Case For Eating Less Meat In 2018

Dec 28, 2017

As the New Year approaches, many Americans will be focusing on what resolutions they'll make to do things differently in 2018. 

Andrew Kulmatiski / Utah State University

When plant ecologists are out for a walk, they see a puzzle. For almost 100 years, they’ve been trying to understand what governs the presence and abundance of a plant species in a community.  

Aimee Tallian

James Coburn works for the Physics Department at Utah State University. He’s the driving force behind a favorite Thanksgiving tradition, the November Physics Demo Show.

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