Niall Clancy

The Half-Century Old 'Land And Water Conservation Fund' Expired Last Month

Since an act of Congress established the Land and Water Conservation Fund in 1965, the program has provided grants to local, state and federal agencies for the acquisition, conservation and maintenance of public lands.

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Rural Utahns More Likely To Be Uninsured, According To Study

Sep 27, 2018
wikemedia.commons.org, inkknife_2000

Twenty percent of low-income Utahns living in metro areas don’t have health insurance and in rural areas, 31 percent of adults are uninsured, according to a report released this week. The findings show that this disparity is the third largest in the nation and cites Medicaid expansion as the most effective way to close the gap.

Students of Utah State University Latinos-In-Action Boot Camp
Vladimir Robles

In 2017, only 77 percent of Utah Latinos graduated high school. The percentage of those going to college is even lower.

Farm-To-Table: A Sumptuous Feast

Sep 27, 2018

In northern Utah, we’re accustomed to a shorter growing season than warmer climates to the south. According to the National Gardening Association, Utah averages 170 days between the last frost and the first frost each year. Saint George is estimated at 207 days, while Logan clocks in at 164.

US FWS, Nate Rathbun

Migration has begun, or did it ever end? Even in our little N. Utah valley its happening. We normally think of migration during the great flocks of birds that pass through during swing months of fall and spring, or the deer and elk coming down for the winter, or swarms of salmon swimming to their death when spawning. But that’s only a small part of the story.

Velet ant, red and black wasp crawling on green plant.
Saint Louis Zoo

Entomologists at Utah State University are studying insects to determine how the size of an insect’s body compares to the size of its sting.

Even though colloquially we call the part of an insect’s body that stings a stinger, it is actually called the sting.

Diagnosed: The Cost Of High Drug Prices

Sep 27, 2018
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“Any chance I get, on the airlines, to give up my seat to get a gift card with cash value on it, I give it up—for this,” said Doug Adams, a North Logan father of a college freshman with type I diabetes. “I have looked at prices around the world and it's a fraction of what we pay. A fraction. I travel to Europe and to India quite frequently and every time I go, I look. And I try to find what is the latest. And it's amazing the cost difference. It really is.”

Dean Wissing/Flicker

Many young parents face unique barriers that keep them and their children caught in cycles of poverty, according to a national report. The report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation shows just 17 percent of Utah parents age 18 to 24 have an associate degree or higher.

Eric Pancer, Wikimedia Commons

At the top of State Street in Salt Lake City, there is an old sandstone building that sits across from the state capitol. The structure is home to the Utah Office of Tourism and a gift store where visitors can buy souvenirs like honey in Utah-shaped bottles and Christmas tree ornaments made from the Great Salt Lake.

Farmers looking for ways to improve crop production while maintaining soil health for future yields are working with scientists at Utah State University. Because of Utah's arid climate, the soil’s health and weeds provide a challenge to farmers and researchers. 

This year, we are getting more and more calls about individuals reporting mice in their neighborhood.  Most times mice can be found living far away from humans but with the onset of colder weather plus periods of unseasonably warm weather, it will promote individuals to move into structures as they search both for food and for cover.  

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Opinion: How China Challenges America's World Leadership

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Chinese President Xi Jinping is ready for a change — specifically the transformation of the international system and China's role within it. In a 2016 speech before government ministers and provincial leaders, Xi provided an early signal of his intent: "China has become a major factor in changing the world political and economic landscapes. ... We need to work harder to turn our economic strength into international institutional authority."

The selections were winnowed down from 1,637 books.

On Wednesday, The National Book Foundation announced the 25 books that remain in the running for the National Book Awards, now in its 69th year.

The writers come from such places as Pittsburgh, Norway, Iran and Poland, and many of them have delved into some of the most pressing conversations of our time: racism, masculinity, addiction, the destruction of indigenous culture, class divides and corporations.

And for the first time since the 1980s, the judges will also honor a work in translation.

When Sadie Dupuis, the lead singer and songwriter of Speedy Ortiz, started playing guitar in her early teens, she didn't think of herself as a "female" guitarist — at least at first.

"I knew that I was the only girl in my high school who played. But it wasn't until I started touring as an adult and seeing how few women were on bills that it started to really matter to me that I was a woman who could play technically challenging parts," Dupuis says.

Across New York City, more than 70 restaurants are tossing their oyster shells not into the trash or composting pile, but into the city's eroded harbor. It's all part of Billion Oyster Project's restaurant shell-collection program.

The mottled spots giraffes are known for aren't random, according to a new study that suggests that the patterns are inherited maternally — and that they may impact the chances of a calf surviving its first few months of life.

The roundness and smoothness of a giraffe's spots are inherited through its mother, wildlife biology researchers reported in the academic journal PeerJ last week.

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