Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Federal agents raided Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh's home, part of city hall and another location Thursday. Pugh is under investigation for alleged "self-dealing" in connection with hundreds of thousands of dollars in payments for a self-published children's book from private companies that were subject to her influence.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte wants Canada to come get tons of trash that was wrongly sent to his country — and he's threatening extreme steps if Canada doesn't clean up the situation. "We'll declare war against them," Duterte said Tuesday.

The Federal Aviation Administration has certified Alphabet's Wing Aviation to operate as an airline, in a first for U.S. drone delivery companies. Wing, which began as a Google X project, has been testing its autonomous drones in southwest Virginia and elsewhere.

President Trump will pay a state visit to the U.K. in early June, according to Buckingham Palace, which says Trump has accepted an invitation from Queen Elizabeth II to visit America's closest ally.

The visit will take place "from Monday 3rd June to Wednesday 5th June," the palace announced Tuesday.

The White House says the state visit "will reaffirm the steadfast and special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom."

The Supreme Court has accepted three cases that ask whether federal anti-discrimination laws should apply to sexual orientation and gender identity in the workplace, putting the court on track to consider high-profile LGBTQ issues after its next term begins this fall.

President Trump will not renew special waivers that have allowed Japan, China, India, Turkey and South Korea to import oil from Iran without running afoul of renewed U.S. sanctions, the White House announced Monday. The waivers are set to expire in early May.

The oil-importing countries have been benefiting from Significant Reduction Exceptions — temporary waivers the Trump administration has been issuing since the president withdrew the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal and reimposed sanctions on Iran last year.

The world is seeing the first-ever image of a black hole Wednesday, as an international team of researchers from the Event Horizon Telescope project released their look at the supermassive black hole at the center of galaxy Messier 87 (M87). The image shows a dark disc "outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity near its event horizon," the consortium said.

"As an astrophysicist, this is a thrilling day for me," said National Science Foundation Director France A. Córdova.

A weather whiplash is predicted to hit people in the Rockies and Plains this week, as conditions go from balmy to blizzard overnight. The high is predicted to be around 80 degrees in Denver and other cities Tuesday — but within 24 hours, blizzard conditions are forecast, the National Weather Service says.

A Hong Kong district court has found nine activists guilty of public nuisance crimes for their roles in organizing massive pro-democracy rallies that took over city streets and became known as the "Umbrella Movement" in 2014.

The rallies were spurred by outrage in Hong Kong over the Chinese government's plans to limit voters' choices among candidates to lead the city's government — a move that was seen as attacking its autonomy.

From Chongqing, NPR's Rob Schmitz reports for our Newscast unit:

Rapidly escalating violence is limiting civilians' ability to travel in and out of Libya's capital. An airstrike on Tripoli's international airport Monday and other recent clashes have now forced some 3,400 people to leave their homes, according to the U.N.'s Humanitarian Affairs office.

"Clashes with heavy weapons are affecting residential areas, and an unknown additional number of civilians are unable to flee these locations," the office said Monday.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is designating Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a foreign terrorist organization, taking an unprecedented step as it seeks to increase pressure on Iran's regime. The move seems certain to bring a new level of tension between the two countries, as Iran's leaders have said they will retaliate in kind.

Iranian lawmakers have prepared legislation that would label part of the U.S. military as a terrorist group, according to Iran's state-run IRNA news agency.

The U.S. has revoked the visa of the International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor, weeks after warning it would take such an action against anyone from the ICC who is investigating allegations that U.S. personnel might have committed war crimes in Afghanistan.

Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda's office confirmed the revocation and, citing the ICC's international mandate, said the prosecutor and her office will continue to pursue their duty "with utmost commitment and professionalism, without fear or favor."

South Korea is using its military to contain a large forest fire that spread quickly after igniting in Gangwon Province, along the country's east coast. Strong winds moved the blaze from city to city, prompting President Moon Jae-in to declare a national emergency.

It's being called the worst wildfire to hit South Korea in years, forcing thousands to evacuate and ravaging rural towns. Fire officials are reporting two deaths, according to the Associated Press.

It was supposed to be a rare quiet afternoon for the House of Commons, a break from the chaos of Brexit. But as members of the U.K. Parliament discussed other issues, their chamber began to take on water, through a large leak in the ceiling. And with rainwater pouring in, business was canceled for the rest of Thursday.

Members of Parliament gamely tried to speak over the sound of water echoing as it splashed into the gallery above them. But as they spoke, they often sneaked glances toward the ceiling, keeping an eye on the deluge while they discussed tax enforcement policies.

With the U.K. poised to leave the European Union, one basic question has loomed over the complicated debates over soft borders and no-deal exits: After Brexit, would Brits be forced to get a visa to visit the EU? On Thursday, the EU Parliament gave its answer: "No."

The EU policy requires full reciprocation from the U.K. government — meaning that if citizens of one or more EU countries are required to get a visa to visit Britain, the EU will reinstate visa requirements for U.K. citizens.

Updated at 10:33 a.m. ET

Malaysia's former Prime Minister Najib Razak is on trial in a wide-ranging corruption case, accused of siphoning millions of dollars from a state investment fund called 1MDB. Najib's trial began Wednesday, nearly a year after he was voted out of office.

Electric vehicles are now the norm in Norway when it comes to new car sales, accounting for 58 percent of all car sales in March. Tesla's mass market Model 3 was especially popular, accounting for nearly 30 percent of new passenger vehicle sales, the Norwegian Information Council for Road Traffic, or OFV, says.

The figures reflect Norway's desire to move away from fossil-fuel vehicles — with help from lucrative government incentives for owners of electric vehicles.

When India blew apart one of its satellites orbiting Earth last week, it created hundreds of pieces of orbital debris, and some of those pieces are large enough and high enough to pose a potential threat to the International Space Station, NASA says.

Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, the target of intense and prolonged protests, will step down before April 28, state media report, citing a message sent from the president's office.

Updated at 12:09 p.m. ET

Thousands of travelers on some of the largest U.S. airlines endured long waits Monday morning, as their flights were delayed owing to a contractor's computer outage. The technical problem forced Southwest Airlines, which had some of the biggest issues, to shut down all U.S. flights for about 40 minutes Monday.

Updated at 10:52 a.m. ET

Opposition candidates made serious gains in local elections in Turkey, winning a powerful post in Ankara and threatening to wrest other large cities away from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling party. In some areas, results remained too close to call.

Sunday's elections, which took place nearly a year after Erdogan was re-elected to a new five-year term, are widely seen as a referendum on both Erdogan's leadership as well as his party's grip on power.

The high-rise building where fire and smoke killed 25 people in Dhaka, Bangladesh's capital, did not have a proper fire suppression system — and some of its emergency exit doors were locked, officials say. A criminal case is being pursued against the building's owners.

The death toll rose sharply after firefighters brought the fire inside the 22-story FR Tower under control Thursday afternoon and were able to search the office building in Dhaka's Banani area.

French film director Agnès Varda, who was a pioneer during the new-wave revolution of the 1950s and '60s and who kept making important films for the next five decades, has died at age 90.

A representative of Varda's family confirmed the news of her death to NPR Friday. In a statement, her film company says the filmmaker and artist "died from a cancer at her home in the night of March 29, 2019, surrounded by her family and friends."

South Korean President Moon Jae-in will visit President Trump in Washington on April 11, after U.S. denuclearization talks with North Korea fizzled; the two sides are now at a stalemate.

Moon and First Lady Kim Jung-sook will visit the Trumps at the White House, where the two leaders will discuss "the latest developments regarding the Democratic People's Republic of Korea as well as bilateral matters," the White House says.

Wow Air's sudden halt of all flights Thursday has caught travelers by surprise, sinking the airline's customers into frustration about their plans and sowing doubts about their ability to recoup travel expenses.

The most intense turmoil hit Wow customers who are currently on trips, as well as those who were slated to fly late Wednesday and early Thursday.

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