Mary Louise Kelly

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If you haven't already heard...

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SHAPIRO: ...Brood X cicadas are still singing across parts of the U.S. including here in Washington, D.C.

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Updated June 10, 2021 at 10:15 AM ET

From the pandemic and protests for racial justice to a pivotal presidential election and Senate runoff, the last year and a half has been a news cycle like no other.

And yes, professional journalists across the country have been all over it. But so have student journalists at college newspapers around the country.

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I was out for a trail run this past weekend through the woods near my house, and a thrumming filled the air - this thrumming.

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Perhaps it didn't exactly start with doughnuts, but doughnuts were certainly present near the beginning.

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Go to your local sports store and you'll find the shelves groaning under the weight of sneakers named for men's basketball stars: Under Armour Currys, the Kawhi by New Balance and many varieties of Jordans — though it's been a long time since MJ dunked in an NBA game.

What you won't find is a single shoe named for a current WNBA player, though that is about to change. On Wednesday, Breanna Stewart, the power forward for the Seattle Storm, announced a deal with Puma that includes her own signature sneaker.

Tanitoluwa Adewumi, a 10-year-old in New York, just became the country's newest national chess master.

At the Fairfield County Chess Club Championship tournament in Connecticut on May 1, Adewumi won all four of his matches, bumping his chess rating up to 2223 and making him the 28th youngest person to become a chess master, according to US Chess.

"I was very happy that I won and that I got the title," he says, "I really love that I finally got it."

Scores of teenage schoolgirls are dead, killed by unknown bombers on Saturday as they were leaving school in Kabul, Afghanistan.

The attackers appeared to have targeted girls. More than 80 people were killed and about 150 injured, most of them girls of high school age. Most were from poor families; many weaved carpets in addition to studying to support their families.

It was the deadliest bombing targeting civilians in at least a year in Afghanistan.

NBC Cancels The Golden Globes Amid HFPA Controversy

May 10, 2021

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Sheriff deputies shot and killed Andrew Brown, Jr., in Elizabeth City, N.C., last week. One of their bodycams captured the shooting, but Superior Court Judge Jeff Foster blocked the full release of the video for at least a month.

Pasquotank County Sheriff Tommy Wooten, who oversees the deputies who killed Brown, a 42-year-old Black man, told All Things Considered that he thinks releasing the video now will help people trust law enforcement

'Citizen Kane' Has A Rotten Day

Apr 29, 2021

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For some eight decades, Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" has been widely viewed as the greatest film ever made.

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ORSON WELLES: (As Charles Foster Kane) Rosebud.

Earlier this month, President Biden announced that the U.S. would withdraw all its troops from Afghanistan by Sept. 11, effectively bringing an end to a "forever war" spurred by the terrorist attacks 20 years earlier on Sept. 11, 2001. His promise has been met with backlash from both Republicans and moderate Democrats in Congress.

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At the Grammys last month, there was a special guest during the performance of rapper Lil Baby's song "The Bigger Picture."

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As of this week, you can buy relatively low-priced COVID-19 rapid tests to take at home. The tests are available through pharmacies and do not require a prescription to buy one.

As former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin awaits sentencing after his conviction on three counts of murder in the death of George Floyd, policymakers in Minneapolis are trying to figure out how to improve policing.

Concurrently, the Justice Department has launched an investigation into the city's police department to address possible patterns of discrimination and excessive force.

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Scientists and public health experts agree that masks are effective at lowering the spread of the coronavirus indoors, where the vast majority of transmission is likely to occur.

But what about outside?

About two dozen states have statewide mask mandates that generally require people to wear masks outside when they're not able to stay at least 6 feet apart. Many cities have their own rules.

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College-bound high schoolers are making their final deliberations ahead of May 1, the national deadline to pick a school. That day will mark the end of a hectic admissions season drastically shaped by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many colleges dropped standardized testing requirements, and because some high schools gave pass/fail grades and canceled extracurriculars and sports, admissions counselors had to change how they read and evaluate applications.

It's no secret why poor countries don't have as many vaccines as rich countries.

"There's really just a scarcity of doses," says Kate Elder, senior vaccine policy adviser at Doctors Without Borders' Access Campaign. The question is, how do you fix it?

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President Biden imposed a tough new round of sanctions on Russia today.

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With the signing on Thursday of President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, Democrats in Washington have now secured their first major achievement since winning control of the White House and both chambers of Congress.

A year ago, everything changed for Americans as a new, highly infectious disease began spreading across the country.

Two scientists, longtime friends and colleagues became two of the most public faces of the U.S. efforts to fight what ultimately became the coronavirus pandemic: Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of former President Trump's White House coronavirus task force, and his boss, Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

Hunger has been weaponized in the war in Yemen, says a former U.N. official who is currently in the country.

"We are seeing a relentless countdown to a possible famine that the world hasn't seen since Ethiopia in the 1980s," says Jan Egeland, who is now secretary-general of the Norwegian Refugee Council.

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