Revisiting 'Homesickness: An American History' On Thursday's Access Utah

Sep 9, 2021

Susan J. Matt's book Homesickness: An American History.
Credit Oxford University Press

Homesickness today is dismissed as a sign of immaturity: it's what children feel at summer camp. But in the nineteenth century it was recognized as a powerful emotion. When gold miners in California heard the tune "Home, Sweet Home," they sobbed. When Civil War soldiers became homesick, army doctors sent them home, lest they die. Such images don't fit with our national mythology, which celebrates the restless individualism of immigrants who supposedly left home and never looked back. 

Susan Matt, author of "Homesickness: An American History" says that iconic symbols of the undaunted, forward-looking American spirit were often homesick, hesitant, and reluctant voyagers. Even today, in a global society that prizes movement and that condemns homesickness as a childish emotion, colleges counsel young adults and their families on how to manage the transition away from home, suburbanites pine for their old neighborhoods, and companies take seriously the emotional toll borne by relocated executives and road warriors. By highlighting how Americans have reacted to moving farther and farther from their roots, Matt revises long-held assumptions about home, mobility, and our national identity.

Susan J. Matt is Presidential Distinguished Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at Weber State University. She is author of Keeping Up with the Joneses: Envy in American Consumer Society, 1890-1930, co-editor (with Peter Stearns) of Doing Emotions History (The History of Emotions), and co-editor (with William Allison) of Dreams, Myths, & Reality: Utah and the American West (The Critchlow Lectures at Weber State University).