Starting Seeds And Planting Planning

Feb 24, 2020

Credit Pixabay

It’s really February out there today-- a bit of snow coming down. But there's a lot of things that we need to start thinking about.

First of all, February is a time to start planting your seed purchases. I've also been checking what I have in seed stocks at home, looking them over and then running some germination tests on them to make sure that the seed is working as it's supposed to be. No point in buying too much seed and no point in letting that seed that you purchase that works well go to waste.

Second thing, it's harder to identify your planting dates. If I try to seed leafy greens and onions too early, that doesn't work so well. For my site. It's usually mid-March, but you need to figure that out for your own place. The Utah climate Center has a lot of good information on it and that's where I would go just kind of figure out planting dates. Also, if you're in St. George right now, you should be planting.

Thirdly, think about those transplants that you're going to need. Most transplants take somewhere between five and eight weeks to get up to size. If you know when your planting date is, then you can work backwards and start planting. I'll probably start doing that toward the end of this month. Seeing as I'm going to transplant things out come early April.

Also, identify those cool season crops that you want to plant first. I'm thinking carrots, radishes and beets if you're dealing with root crops, or lettuce and spinach and mustards and kales and things like that for leafy greens for salads. Don't forget your onions and shallots and leeks, and finally put peas out there. Maybe a new bed of asparagus or some rhubarb this year.

According to Punxsutawney Phil springs coming early this year. I don't see it yet. So watch out, pay attention to the weather and then use that to help get yourself ready.