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"Interwoven: Junipers And The Web Of Being" With Kristen Rogers-Iversen On Monday's Access Utah

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What do the following have in common? Ghost beads, biotic communities, gin, tree masticators, Puebloan diapers, charcoal, folklore, historic explorers, spiral grain, tree life cycles, spirituality, packrat middens, climate changes, wildfire, ranching, wilderness, and land management policies. The answer is the juniper tree.

In her new book, “Interwoven: Junipers and the Web of Being,” Kristen Rogers-Iversen says that throughout prehistory and history, junipers have influenced ecosystems, cultures, mythologies, economics, politics, and environmental controversies. She argues that in terms of their effects on human lives the juniper may be the most significant tree in the interior West.

Kristen Rogers-Iversen is an award-winning author who has worked as an independent editor and writer; as a therapeutic musician for hospice patients; and as an editor, writer, and administrator at the Utah Division of State History. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Utah and is a Certified Music Practitioner.

 

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996. He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.) He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah.” He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.