Project Resilience: Becoming Resilient By Overcoming Resistance

The award-winning UPR production team and Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities presents Project Resilience, a yearlong storytelling project created for any of us hoping to find ways to bounce back, recover, and develop our mental abilities. The stories found in the series hope to encourage social and personal resilience by introducing listeners to neighbors and friends who have experienced assault, personal loss, bullying, mental health challenges and other tragedies.

We're working with local, state and national organizations to make public radio programs, distribute a podcast, provide tools for living, and create a resilience resource database. 

  • Ideas for becoming more resilient can be found here. 
  • Resilient parenting tips can be found here.
  • The "Mental Health Crossroads" podcast, produced by MHDD, can be listned to on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Podbean.
  • List of community connections will be available shortly. 
            Check back often for updates. 

Do you or your organization have a resiliency story you would like to share or a resource to add to our growing list? Call the UPR Project Resilience phone line to share your story or tip at (435) 797-9679 or email us at upr@usu.edu.

Be sure to:

  • Leave your name and contact information
  • Share a brief description of your story or tip. 

The Project Resilience series premieres January 2020. 

Project Resilience is made possible in part by our members, the Utah State University Center for Persons With Disabilities, and The Family Place.

Petr Kratochvil

 

Social distancing means the Cache Employment and Training Center has to be creative in the ways they serve their clients.  

Tamsen Maloy

 

 

According to a 2018 study from the Urban Indian Health Institute, Utah ranks 8th in the nation for the   

number of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. Utah legislators recently formed a task force to address why Utah’s numbers are so high. But the bill is only a part of the overall work being done to address this issue. 

UPR will broadcast a special epsiode of The Pulse from WNYY on how to be resilient during the pandemic. The edpisode will be played on UPR at 10 a.m. on Friday and at 3 p.m. on Saturday. After it airs, it can be found online here

 


Social distancing guidelines mean the services Utah drug courts provide have been drastically cut back and altered. Earlier this week, we looked at how staff at the Bear River Health Department are adapting to meet safety guidelines. Now, we share with you the experience of one drug court participant. 

While social distancing and event cancellations make it harder for organizations to connect the public to humanities projects, Deena Pyle at Utah Humanities created a Virtual Campfire campaign to increase public involvement, connection and conversations.
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Deena Pyle, the communication director for the non-profit Utah Humanities, said she’s impressed and inspired by the ways people are fighting to stay connected despite all of the social distancing initiatives enacted in the state to slow the spread of the coronavirus. So inspired, she created the organization’s Virtual Campfire social media and email campaign to encourage conversations about the impact of the humanities in our lives.

 

Utah drug courts play an important role in addressing the state’s opioid epidemic, especially in rural communities. Now that efforts to mitigate the coronavirus pandemic are limiting face-to-face interactions many of these services are being moved to virtual platforms. 

Courtesy of Jackie Worthen


As concerns about shortages of personal protective equipment and hospital overcrowding during the coronavirus pandemic grew, Utah’s governor issued an executive order last month stopping all elective surgeries in the state. For one Cedar City family, this means their five-month-old baby is awaiting a postponed cleft lip and palate surgery.

 

“Vernal strong” is the motto right now in one Unitah Basin community as residents work together to help each other through not only the global pandemic, but also the downturn in the oil and gas  industry which has hit the community hard. 

Courtesy of Nielsen Family

 


Being a new parent can be exhausting. 

 

Jordan: “You’d be falling asleep and you’re so tired and then you have some kind of thought of, ‘Oh, he’s in the bed with us,’ and  you forgot that you put him in his crib, so he’s in the crib, but then you’re all stressed looking through the bed trying to find him.” 

 

Stress, anxiety, domestic violence rates rise due to the coronavirus pandemic. Utah increasing free resources to cope with COVID-19, coronavirus-related mental health issues.
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There’s an ever-growing number of free telephone and online resources for Utahns who are dealing with stress and anxiety brought on by the coronavirus pandemic and related job losses. Morissa Henn, the Community Health program director at Intermountain Healthcare, is part of the group that formed the Emotional Health Relief Hotline to help Utahns with mental-health needs as they arise. 

This isn’t breaking news, but every one of us is feeling some tension, a lot of uncertainty.

And if you are, so are your kids or, sometimes, grandkids, in the case of Vonda Jump Norman, an assistant professor of Social Work.

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The stress of staying home and the unknowns of a global pandemic can be hard on our brains. Here is some advice from local professionals on ways you can maintain your mental health at this time.

How do survivors of sexual trauma overcome the mental health issues that often accompany these kinds of experiences? On Monday’s Access Utah we will talk to survivors about their healing journeys, as well as a wide variety of healers, who help people overcome trauma in many different ways .

Robert Cutts


 

Two bills improving services to people with mental illness were signed into Utah law this week, allocating $24 million for the first year and $17 million in ongoing funds. These bills seek to keep people out of the hospital if possible, and also to make sure that if a person in crisis needs hospitalization, there’s a bed available.  

Coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing requirements have led to many churches to close to the public.
Sari Huella / Wikimedia Commons

During the Easter season is when many churches are busy collecting palm leaves, planning choir programs and preparing for one of the most important days in christianity. But this year, churches across the world are implementing changes, like going digital, to continue to provide services while maintaining social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic. 

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During this global pandemic, many medical decisions are having to be made about who can receive what kind of care. Disability rights activists, like Storee Powell, who works at the Center for Person’s with Disabilities at Utah State University, said many of the current policies are discriminatory. UPR’s Matilyn Mortensen spoke with Powell about why she finds these attitudes so concerning.

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On Tuesday’s Access Utah, as a part of UPR’s Project Resilience, we’re going to talk about how to be resilient with all that’s happening with the coronavirus pandemic, including social distancing. We’ll also talk about how all of this is impacting children and individuals with disabilities.

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As we all deal the best we can with Coronavirus and COVID-19, we want to hear examples that you have heard or experienced of people, businesses or organizations doing good.

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Between efforts to mitigate the spread of coronavirus and the largest earthquake Utah has seen in 28 years, there is a lot of uncertainty right now. It’s hard for everyone to deal with, but children especially may find themselves confused when large, scary, current events like these dominate the news cycle. 

You may be experiencing anxiety or stress regarding all the news about COVID-19. You're not alone. Here are four simple things you can do to help keep yourself and others healthy.

Carrie da Cruz, Tara Roche and Nicole Kaae at Brigham Suicide Prevention in Brigham City.
JoLynne Lyon

In Utah, suicide is the leading cause of death for youth ages 10 to 24, according to a 2019 report out of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute and the Utah Hospital Association. But communities and individuals are finding ways to support each other and prevent more loss. One example is the group Brigham Suicide Prevention in Brigham City, where they are building resilience in individuals and the community.

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Studying music in college may lead to students facing additional emotional strain because of the deeply personal nature of their work.

Statewide Internet Safety Initiative Launches

Feb 11, 2020
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Tuesday is Safer Internet Day and the launch of the statewide initiative, “Be Awesome Online.” The campaign has the goal of helping children and parents be safe on the internet.

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Photo by Chris Gerber on Unsplash


A bill that would provide one million dollars in one-time funding and nearly five million dollars in ongoing funds seeks to add 30 beds to the Utah State Mental Hospital. It would also improve supports, including housing assistance, for people after they are released.  

 

JoLynne Lyon

 

 

The Utah Legislature is now in full swing at the State Capitol. Last week, many people with disabilities and their families went there with the mission of learning how to tell lawmakers the ways policies affect their lives. 

 

Hasty Book List

Sadie Hoagland’s new book “American Grief in Four Stages,” a collection of short fiction, asks the question: why does our country do so little for the bereaved? Why do we have only empty cliché to address the grief of others? Why do we expect people to just "get over" insurmountable tragedy?          

UPR's Project Resilience Parenting Tips

Nov 22, 2019

Parenting can be the hardest and most rewarding thing some people will ever do. It is invigorating at times, and so often, it is just exhausting and makes us wonder about our own self-worth. These tips are to help increase our parenting resilience-- our ability to effectively keep it together when our kids are driving us nuts.

These tips are brought to you by UPR's Project Resilience. Learn more about the project here. Tips were written by Vonda Jump Norman, a social work professor at Utah State University and director of the Trauma Resilience Project at The Family Place and Alex Schiwal, a researcher with Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities.

UPR's Project Resilience Tips

Nov 22, 2019

Resilience is an important aspect of mental health and this series of tips will provide you with research-based ideas on how you can build your personal resiliency.  

These tips are brought to you by UPR's Project Resilience. Learn more about the project here. Tips were written by Matthew Wappett, director of Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities,  Alex Schiwal, a researcher with Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities, Derrik Tollefson, head of USU's Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology, Kevin Webb with the I-System Institute at USU and Em Capito an integrative psychotherapist.

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