Utah State University News

 

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Utah Public Radio presents UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY NEWS - the podcast home for all of UPR's reporting on USU.   

 

Today on Access Utah, we preview an event next week. Living historians Nathan Richardson and Renée-Noelle Felice will perform on the USU campus as Frederick Douglass and Lucretia Mott, honoring their amazing lives and legacies, which are as relevant today as they were one hundred years ago.


Students from Utah State University’s Latinx Creative Society celebrated Day of the Dead on Saturday. It was a parade that honored the dead, but also focused on ways to support those living with mental health challenges.

Kat Webb / UPR

In October, Utah State University President Noelle Cockett gave an address naming diversity and inclusion as priorities for the year. She also said involvement at many of the universities’ multicultural and non-traditional lounges at the Taggert Student Center is ever-increasing. 

The School of Applied Sciences, Technology and Education, or ASTE, ran into an interesting problem - the department keeps growing. Their solution? Divide the students and faculty of USU's College of Agriculture and Applied Science's largest department into two departments that can be better managed. This department divide will take place at both the Logan and Price Utah State University campuses.

An unusual and significant event is happening today at Utah State University. The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, one of the courts just below the U.S. Supreme Court and based in Denver, is in session at the Performance Hall on the USU campus. They are hearing oral arguments in two sessions and then will take questions from the audience.

David Maisel (b. 1961, New York) is an artist working in photography and video, and the recipient of a 2018 Guggenheim Fellowship in the Creative Arts. Among his chief concerns are the politics and aesthetics of radically human-altered environments, and how we perceive our place in time via investigations of cultural artifacts from both past and present. His work focuses on power and the production of space by examining landscapes and objects that are off-limits, quarantined, or hidden from view.

We have had our first frost here in Cache County and my tomatoes really were damaged. I may get a few more fruit that are hiding deep in the plant but for the most part I am not going to be able to store them.

David Brown is Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at Utah State University. A while back he gave a talk in the Science Unwrapped series from the College of Science titled “Artificial Intelligence: Too Late to Stop the Robot Apocalypse?” Professor Brown says “Perhaps ironically, salient technology superstars, like Elon Musk and Bill Gates, and publicly known geniuses, like Stephen Hawking, have spoken out and warned us about the advent of artificial intelligence (AI).

It’s anecdotal. But I think it’s a thing. I’m hearing from a growing number of people that they’re disengaging from the news and, in some cases, from politics. We’re going to talk about it next time on Access Utah. My guests will include USU Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Jason Gilmore; and University of Utah Law Professor RonNell Anderson Jones. And I’d love to get your perspective on this. You can email me right now to upraccess@gmail.com

Andrew McAllister / Caine College of the Arts

The Department of Theatre Arts at Utah State University opened its 2019-20 season last weekend with the contemporary drama Civics and Humanities for Non-Majors.

Discussions about Electric Vehicles on Access Utah

Sep 24, 2019

We’re answering your questions about Electric Vehicles today. Our guests include USU student and EV owner Samuel Bona; EV owner and early adopter John Loveless; EV and Electric Bicycle owner and USU Associate Professor of Computer Science Nicholas Flann; and Rep. Raymond Ward, who is working to develop an EV charging infrastructure in Utah.  Originally aired on 9-10-19

Encyclopedia Britannica

John DeVilbiss writes in USU Magazine, "It flashes like a beacon to millions of birds on migratory marathons. It is a sea in the sand that shimmers lavender in one glance and pale turquoise in another. A place you can go for an entire day without seeing a single soul, yet where two million people live within an hour's drive. It is a lake of paradoxes, said historian Dale Morgan, a liquid lie, said Terry Tempest Williams. The salty truth, however, is that the Great Salt Lake, the largest saline lake in the Western hemisphere, is drying up."

USU

On this pledge drive edition of Access Utah, we're joined by Dean Joseph Ward of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at USU.

usu.edu

  Utah State University is joining the nation and state in celebrating significant voting rights anniversaries in 2020: the 150th anniversary of suffrage for Utah women; the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States; and the 55th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act. As the university honors these important milestones in our history, and as part of those celebrations, Utah State University also declares this the Year of the Woman.

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Plants in the garden need a little bit of help with this heat so we’re going to give you some tips this week. 

Andrew McAllister – Caine College of the Arts)

If you don’t think that a 90-minute farce with a tiny cast can be as entertaining as a full-scale musical comedy, then you obviously haven’t seen the Lyric Repertory Company’s current production of Murder for Two.

Lyric Repertory Company

The New York Times calls A Raisin in the Sun “the play that changed American theater forever.” In this play, Hansberry - a pioneering, female, African-American playwright - covers issues of racism, discrimination, generational clashes, civil rights, and the women’s movement through the divergent dreams and conflicts within three generations of the Younger family. The Younger family’s heroic struggle to retain dignity in a harsh and changing world is a searing and timeless document of hope and inspiration.

Berkeley Wellness

Utah State University was awarded a $500,000 three-year Farmers Market Promotion Program grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The grant will fund a variety of capacity-building, outre

ach, and marketing activities that will help connect more low-income and ethnically diverse populations to health local food. 

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

The Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative was launched by Utah State University Extension in 2018 in an effort to provide effective resources to address opioid use among rural Utahns. The initiative team is working to combat the effects of opioid misuse through prevention, recovery and treatment, with a primary focus on stigma reduction education. Today on Access Utah we preview the summit.

Andrew McAllister - USU Caine College of the Arts

In a surprisingly gutsy move, the Lyric Repertory Company has played the high-voltage drama card again in its 2019 season. The Lyric’s trademark is feel-good comedies and small-cast musicals, after all. But the company’s artistic directors Richie Call and Jason Spelbring have assembled a group of performers who represent a high-water mark of talent this year. So why not go for broke?

USU Research and Graduate Studies

Superhero stories have been called the myths of our day, helping us understand who we are and what unites us. Since Superman first leapt tall buildings with a single bound, the vast majority of the characters have been white, straight, men. Movies and television have consistently held to this standard, giving us Han Solo and Luke Skywalker to root for as they rescue Leia. However, in recent years we have seen new faces in popular franchises and behind the masks of our already beloved heroes.

Utah State University

Native American Culinary Association founder, Chef Nephi Craig, is visiting Utah State University to conduct a series of foods presentations and deliver a lecture on his work with the “Three Sisters” of Native American cuisine—beans, corn and squash—and to teach nutrition and share cultural heritage.   

Along with sharing on indigenous foodways, Craig will meet with folklore, nutrition, and plant, soils and climate students. Craig will give a lecture on March 6 at 3 p.m. at Merrill-Cazier Library in room 101, with a reception to follow.

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