Weekend Edition Saturday

Saturdays from 6:00 - 9:00 a.m.
  • Hosted by Scott Simon

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. This two-hour morning newsmagazine covers hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

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Back in the studio, time for sports.

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SIMON: All right, I got a grip now. The Dodgers are a game up on the Rays, but sometimes the story is the game within the game. Meanwhile, Big Ten football takes the field.

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There's a controversy in Gloucester County, New Jersey, that began at a football game on October 4. The national anthem was about to be played when the running back for the Gibbstown Falcons told his coach, Rashad Thomas, "I want to kneel."

Coach Thomas told his running back, "I'll kneel with you." An assistant coach joined them. Coach Thomas told his players that no one had to kneel, but soon the whole team had joined them, and held hands. They were teammates.

StoryCorps' Military Voices Initiative records stories from members of the U.S. military and their families.

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(Reading) Once there was a goat who lived in a pen on a farm.

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"The Perfect Weapon," now on HBO, is a documentary about a danger we've all heard a lot about but don't really know.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "THE PERFECT WEAPON")

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Joy can be so hard to come by these days. But Tommy Kahikina Ching has found some.

TOMMY KAHIKINA CHING: I love cooking. It's my chance to be an artist.

SIMON: He recently made a masterpiece.

In the torrent of news this week, one line especially pierced me: "Interactions may be less positive when they become artificial."

It comes from researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna and the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria, who compared the vital signs of 28 cows as they were petted while listening to a live human voice, and those same cows being petted while they heard merely a recording. They published their findings in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

A true reporter knows you don't have to venture to the other side of the world to find great stories. Look right in front of you.

Jim Dwyer was 19, and a Fordham student, when he saw a man on the ground, shaking on a sidewalk in the Bronx. He was having an epileptic seizure. Jim was among the strangers who stopped to try to help. But there were also people who passed by and muttered, "'junkie, 'scumbag,' that sort of thing," he later wrote for the student newspaper, The Fordham Ram.

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The Week In Sports

Oct 10, 2020

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And it's time for sports.

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SIMON: And a couple of games last night reminded us of the human drama sports can deliver, even when there are only cardboard fans in the seats. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Tom, thanks so much for being with us.

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President Trump has been hospitalized after testing positive for the coronavirus. Doctors gave an update on his condition Saturday.

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White House physician Sean Conley says that President Trump was doing "very well" and that the symptoms he had are resolving and improving.

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Updated at 4:39 p.m. ET

Conflicting reports emerged Saturday about President Trump's health and the timeline of when he was first tested positive for the coronavirus.

Trump is "doing very well," his physician told reporters on Saturday morning, but a source familiar with the president's health later told White House pool reporters, that "the president's vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning." The Associated Press identified that information as coming from White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.

A lot of Americans may wonder this morning: How could the president, of all people, come down with the coronavirus?

The President of the United States is often called the most powerful person in the world. They can cause armies to march and rockets to soar. They also can hear directly from some of the finest scientific and medical minds in the world. Presidents are surrounded by rings of highly-trained security guards, who protect them at all times.

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What is bread? You might as well ask, who's BJ Leiderman, who writes our theme music? But Ireland's Supreme Court has considered the question raised by the case of a Subway sandwich. NPR's Alina Selyukh tore into this story.

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Good weeks and bad, it's time for sports.

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Rita Wilson Wants You To Get Your Flu Shot

Sep 26, 2020

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I wait all week to say it's time for sports.

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Congress used to like to pass spending bills before an election. Representatives could return home to campaign and say, "Look what we did for you!"

But with 13.6 million people out of work, Congress may not pass a new coronavirus relief bill. Both parties may feel, in today's fractious politics, they can fire up their supporters best if they don't compromise, and blame the other party.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., says it would be "political hypocrisy" for Republicans to move ahead and confirm a nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court before Election Day.

"I've seen things I've questioned, but I've never seen political hypocrisy at this level. I mean, it will actually go down in the journals of political hypocrisy," Leahy said in an interview Saturday with NPR's Weekend Edition.

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., about the life and legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and the political maneuvering following her death.

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Chick Corea is one of America's giants of jazz, beginning in the late '60s and his work with Miles Davis, then his acclaimed 1972 debut album, "Return To Forever."

(SOUNDBITE OF CHICK COREA'S "LA FIESTA")

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Now we go to sports. The Stanley Cup games begin, bringing two Sunbelt teams to play for the Cup in Alberta. And Big 10 football will be played after all. We're now joined by ESPN's Howard Bryant. Howard. Thanks for being with us.

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