Access Utah

Robin Wigglesworth and his book "Trillions."
Penguin Random House

Today we’ll talk with Robin Wigglesworth, the global finance correspondent at the Financial Times, about his new book "Trillions: How a Band of Wall Street Renegades Invented the Index Fund and Changed Finance Forever."

The Moth is true stories, told live and without notes. You hear the Moth Radio Hour each week on UPR. The Moth Mainstage, the live stage show, is coming to Cache Arts in Logan. Ahead of that event, one of the Moth Mainstage hosts, Jon Goode, will join us today.

A white building with a flag next to it.
aaup.edu

Today we’ll be talking about the Arab-American University in Palestine. Several USU faculty members and others played a role in the founding and early success of AAUP in the early 2000s.

usu.edu

Today a conversation with Sen. Brent Hill about civil discourse. Brent Hill is the Next Generation Program Director for the National Institute for Civil Discourse. He’ll be talking with Neil Abercrombie, USU Vice President for Government Relations, in an event at the David B. Haight Center on the USU campus on Monday at 4:00 p.m.

A poster for the film "Dog Valley."
IMDb

Our guest for the hour today is Chad Anderson. He has made a documentary film called Dog Valley which tells the story of Gordon Church, a young gay man who was kidnapped, raped, tortured and brutally murdered in rural Utah, as well as the stories of the two men who killed him, Michael Archuleta (currently on death row) and Lance Wood (currently in a minimum security prison). The film features an interview with Wood himself and delves into true crime and the long-term effects of trauma.

janbrookssynergies.com

Janice Brooks, Chairwoman of the Utah Humanities Council, governing board member for Intermountain Healthcare St. George Regional Hospital and IHC Ethics Committee member, will give a keynote address to the One Utah Summit titled Leading with Creativity, Kindness and Inclusion. That speech is tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. The summit is ongoing today and tomorrow at Southern Utah University and is being streamed live at suu.edu/sutvlive.

stephentrimble.net

Stephen Trimble’s new book The Mike File is a memoir. Psychosis overwhelmed Trimble’s brother Mike at 14. Trimble’s parents had no choice but to commit Mike to the Colorado State Hospital. Mike left when Steve was six. He never lived at home again. In his new book Trimble takes readers along on Mike's heartbreaking journey, noting that Mike’s life parallels the history of our treatment of the mentally ill over the last 70 years. Stephen Trimble and Douglas Goldsmith, the former Executive Director of The Children’s Center in Salt Lake City will join us today. 

USU College of Science

The USU College of Science is presenting a panel discussion titled “A Time to Die.” This virtual panel is tomorrow at 7:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Panelists will discuss physician-assisted dying, currently legal in a number of U.S. states, and how this practice might be implemented in Utah.

Liliana Cadena / Lockdown Essentials

In conjunction with the Moth Mainstage event coming to Logan next month, UPR and Cache Arts are presenting 15 Things Utahns Can’t Live Without in a Pandemic, which is based on NPR’s 15 Things Folks Can’t Live Without in a Pandemic. The project is about the power of storytelling, and how it can be a catharsis and a way of processing as we collectively deal with this ongoing global pandemic.

The words "Debunked Podcast" next to sound waves.
USU Department of Kinesiology and Health Science

Today we are presenting our sixth live episode of Debunked, the only Utah podcast combining evidence-based health practices with storytelling to challenge the stereotypes, and debunk the myths about harm reduction, substance use disorders and homelessness. 

HarperCollins

The economy says we must always consume more: even the slightest drop in spending leads to widespread unemployment, bankruptcy and home foreclosure.

The planet says we consume too much: in America, we burn the earth’s resources at a rate five times faster than it can regenerate. And despite efforts to “green” our consumption—by recycling, increasing energy efficiency or using solar power—we have yet to see a decline in global carbon emissions.

marioncbishop.com


It’s UPR’s Fall Member Drive. During our Spring Drive we talked with emergency room doctor, writer and UPR member Marion Bishop, who works at Cache Valley Hospital and Brigham City Community Hospital. We also talked with her last year as a part of an episode featuring frontline workers.

music.usu.edu

Once again it's a Member Drive edition of the program. Our special guest for the hour is Craig Jessop, Music Director of the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra.

kensandersbooks.com

It’s a member drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Ken Sanders from Ken Sanders Rare Books in Salt Lake City. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite recent episodes of the program.

rememberthe43students.com

Dixie State University’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences is bringing the “Remember the 43 Students” art installation to their campus. This installation commemorates the six people who were killed and the 43 students who were “disappeared” in a night of unspeakable political violence in Iguala, Guerrero state, Mexico on September 26, 2014.

pamhouston.net

On her 120-acre homestead high in the Colorado Rockies, writer Pam Houston learns what it means to care for a piece of land and the creatures on it. Elk calves and bluebirds mark the changing seasons, winter temperatures drop to 35 below, and lightning sparks a 110,000-acre wildfire, threatening her century-old barn and all its inhabitants.

aftercredits.com


Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. We’ve lost 50% of the world’s coral in the last 30 years. Scientists say that climate change is now their greatest threat and it is estimated that only 10% can survive past 2050. In a new documentary film, “Chasing Coral,” a team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why coral are vanishing and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.

awaytogarden.com

Douglas Tallamy’s first book, “Bringing Nature Home,” awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. In this new book, Tallamy takes the next step and outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation. “Nature’s Best Hope” shows how homeowners everywhere can turn their yards into conservation corridors that provide wildlife habitats. Talllamy says that because this approach relies on the initiatives of private individuals, it is immune from the whims of government policy. Even more important, it’s practical, effective, and easy.

Kirkus Reviews

An alternative prison ranch in New Mexico conducts a daring experiment: setting the troubled residents out to retrain an aggressive herd of horses. The horses and prisoners both arrive at the ranch broken in one way or many— the horses often abandoned and suspicious, the residents, some battling drug and alcohol addiction, emotionally, physically, and financially shattered. Ginger Gaffney’s job is to retrain the untrainable. With time, the horses and residents form a profound bond, and teach each other patience, control, and trust.

courant.com


Today we feature a conversation with renowned actor and author George Takei. He is coming to Utah for the Moab Music Festival, which has commissioned a new work based on his speeches, personal writings, and recollections of his and his family’s internment in camps for Japanese Americans during World War II.

famousnews.org

Take a look at your favorite pair of jeans. Maybe you bought them on Amazon or the Gap; maybe the tag says “Made in Bangladesh” or “Made in Sri Lanka.” But do you know where they really came from, how many thousands of miles they crossed, or the number of hands who picked, spun, wove, dyed, packaged, shipped, and sold them to get to you? 

Department of Kinesiology and Health Science at Utah State University


Today we present a live episode of the Debunked Podcast. Host Tom Williams and Debunked Podcast host Don Lyons welcome Mary Jo McMillen, Executive Director of USARA (Utah Support Advocates for Recovery Awareness) and Ashanti Moritz, Outreach Director for the Skull Valley Band of Goshutes' Warrior Spirit Recovery Center to debunk the myth “indigenous and non-indigenous groups can't work together to solve social problems.”

Newsbreak

We’re going to talk about housing in Utah today. Here are some headlines from the past several months: How tight is Utah’s housing market? Some buyers offer $100K over asking; ‘Hyper-, hyper-competitive’  Salt Lake area housing market is white hot, but are Californians to blame?; What’s driving Utah’s housing crisis? It’s not what you think, says economist;  Housing affordability in Utah entering ‘perilous territory,’ study says; The pandemic has supercharged Utah’s housing market.

michaelsowder.org

A while back on Access Utah, Michael Sowder, USU professor of English and affiliated professor of religious studies, helped us learn some of the history and current practice of yoga. On Tuesday’s Access Utah he’ll lead us in an exploration of mindfulness and meditation, which may be of special interest during these times of pandemic.

Penguin Random House

Misinformation, disinformation, and fake news abound and it’s increasingly difficult to know what’s true. Our media environment has become hyperpartisan. Science is conducted by press release. Jevin West is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington. He directs the Center for an Informed Public, whose mission is to resist strategic misinformation, promote an informed society, and strengthen democratic discourse. He is co-author with Carl Bergstrom of “Calling Bullshit,” a book on how to spot and refute misinformation.

Goodreads


The Personal Librarian is a historical novel about J. P. Morgan’s personal librarian, Belle da Costa Greene, the Black American woman who was forced to hide her true identity and pass as white in order to leave a lasting legacy that enriched our nation, from New York Times bestselling author Marie Benedict, and acclaimed author Victoria Christopher Murray.

Undark Magazine


The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.

PureWow

Today we’ll talk with Senator Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, the first Asian American woman and the only immigrant currently serving in the U.S. Senate. Her new memoir "Heart of Fire: An Immigrant Daughter’s Story" is an inspiring account of one woman coming into her personal and political power, a heartwarming homage to the women who raised her, and a behind-the-scenes look at some of the most fraught moments of the Trump administration.

Travel Channel

St. Anne’s Retreat, located in Logan Canyon, is well-known to Cache Valley residents due to the folklore of the place: tales of demonic nuns, evil witches, murdered babies, and more. Often referred to as “The Nunnery,” the site is a hub for thrill-seekers who trespass onto the property to see for themselves if the stories are true.

Amazon

Part memoir, part meditation on poetry, part conversation with her husband, friends, and the many animals that live with and around her, Katharine Coles’s The Stranger I Become probes the permeable boundary between inner life and outer, thought and action, science and experience. Coles begins this collection of lyric essays with a meditation on walking, and “the urge to move beyond, to understand myself as a stranger, estranged.”

Pages