Behind the Headlines

Salt Lake Tribune

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reverses a policy that generally prevented the children of same-sex parents from joining the faith, and that labeled same-sex married couples apostates.

Herald Journal

Former Utah State University football star Torrey Green is sentenced to 26-years-to-life in prison for sexual assaults. Sen.

Salt Lake Tribune

More candidates join an already-crowded field after Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski announces she won’t be running for a second term. Governor Gary Herbert quietly lets a bill allowing the storage of depleted uranium in Utah to become law. And the passage of a controversial gravel-mine protection bill draws the ire of environmentalists

Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune

Bills at the 2019 Utah legislative session addressed hate crimes

utah.gov

Amendments drastically alter a bill to ban conversion therapy in Utah, leading to the 

Salt Lake Tribune

BYU's police department faces decertification after failing to investigate alleged misconduct by one of its officers. A measure that would prevent cities from banning plastic bags advances at the legislature. And Utah U.S. Rep. Ben McAdams votes against president Trump’s border emergency.

Salt Lake Tribune

A Utah hate crimes bill clears another hurdle, but its sponsor says he expects a fight on the senate floor. Lawmakers unveil a proposed ban so-called conversion therapy. And the Sandy City Council opens an investigation into the city's response to contaminated water.  At 9 a.m. on Friday, Salt Lake Tribune senior managing editor Matt Canham, reporter Taylor Stevens, and columnist George Pyle join KCPW's Roger McDonough to talk about the week's top stories.

Salt Lake Tribune

Residents of a Salt Lake City apartment complex are forced to evacuate after the property is deemed unsafe to occupy. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints opposes increasing the alcohol content of store-bought beer. And the Salt Lake City School District wants a seat on the Utah Inland Port Board.   At 9 a.m. on Friday, Salt Lake Tribune government and politics editor Dan Harrie, reporter Taylor Stevens, and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW guest host Marcie Young Cancio to talk about the week's top stories.

KSL

  A bill to replace voter-approved Medicaid expansion moves forward despite a "no" vote from its House sponsor. After historic changes in San Juan County, freshman Utah Rep. Phil Lyman says it might be time for a portion of the county to split away. And lawmakers endorse deleting language from the Utah constitution allowing slavery as a form of criminal punishment.  At 9 a.m. on Friday, Salt Lake Tribune government and politics editor Dan Harrie, reporter Bethany Rodgers, and columnist Holly Richardson join KCPW's Roger McDonough to talk about the week's top stories.

Salt Lake Tribune

A Utah lawmaker introduces a bill to ban abortions after 15 weeks, despite a federal judge striking down a similar measure in Mississippi. The closure of the Salt Lake City homeless shelter gets delayed while construction kinks are worked out for one of three new, smaller, shelters. And celebrities and filmmakers descend on Utah as the 2019 Sundance Film Festival gets underway.    At 9 a.m. on Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporters Bethany Rodgers, Taylor Stevens and Sean P. Means, and editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce join KCPW's Roger McDonough to talk about the week's top stories.

Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune

Despite renewed criticism from the mother of slain student Lauren McCluskey, the University of Utah 

Flickr: Gage Skidmore

Days before being sworn in as Utah's newest senator, Mitt Romney 

A sign reads, "Welcome to Utah."
Wikimedia Commons

     

Salt Lake Tribune editors reflect on the stories that defined 2018, including the debate around medical marijuana, the seismic shifts inside the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, election-year battles, fallen heroes, gun protests and wildfires. 

Salt Lake Tribune

   

The Utahns in the running to replace Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who is stepping down amid ethics investigations. A new report shows a link between Wasatch Front air pollution and miscarriages, but many doctors aren't talking about it with their patients. And neighbors work to shut down a homeless hospice clinic on Salt Lake City's east side. 

CNN

Rep. Chris Stewart defends President Trump's comments on the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, saying "journalists disappear" everywhere.  Also, activists are suing the state, after the Utah Legislature passes a medical marijuana law that replaces the ballot measure passed in the midterm elections. And with two years left in the mayoral term of Rep.-elect Ben McAdams, candidates come forward to convince Democratic delegates to make them Salt Lake County mayor.  

KUER

Lawmakers hear from the public on the Utah Cannabis Act, which will be put to a vote during a special session of the state legislature. Also, an Inland Port watchdog criticizes the naming of oil and gas advocates to a new technical committee. And Sen. Mike Lee blocks a bipartisan attempt to protect the special counsel investigation. 

Salt Lake Tribune

Rep. Mia Love's campaign sues to stop counting ballots in Salt Lake County, while the margin in the 4th congressional district race turns razor-thin. Seventy-one incarcerated people died in Utah jails in the past five years. And Salt Lake City jockeys to host another winter Olympics. 

Salt Lake Tribune

The dust is settling after the 2018 midterm elections. What does the future hold for the citizen ballot initiatives that passed? Plus, President Donald Trump lashes out at Rep. Mia Love. And Utah remembers North Ogden Mayor Brent Taylor, who was killed in an insider attack in Afghanistan. At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporter Brian Maffly, government and politics editor Dan Harrie and editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

Daily Herald

Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes holds a public meeting to discuss the medical cannabis compromise legislation he crafted with proponents and opponents of Proposition 2. Also, due to high drug costs, a Utah health insurance group is paying for public employees to fill prescriptions in Mexico. And the local faith community responds to the recent shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue. 

Salt Lake Tribune

Tragedy strikes at the University of Utah when a student athlete is murdered on campus, approximately one year after the shooting death of another student at the University. A debate between candidates for Utah's 3rd Congressional District reveals stark differences in the race. And members of the Ute Mountain Ute tribe express concern about water pollution near the Utah uranium mill that abuts the town of White Mesa.  

KUER

Rep. Mia Love says the Federal Election Commission has cleared her of illegal fundraising and that her challenger, Ben McAdams, is unethical and should withdraw from the race. Also, four women ask the Utah Supreme Court to assign a special prosecutor to sexual assault cases that the Salt Lake County District Attorney's office declined to pursue. And the story of an unsolved murder from 1978 shows how evidence is maintained--and how cold cases are investigated today.  At 9 a.m.

LDS Church News

The November election ballots hit mailboxes this week, with 27 of Utah's 29 counties voting primarily by mail. Plus, comments by Latter-day Saint leader Dallin H. Oaks about the LGBTQ community stir up controversy. And President Donald Trump's approval rating in Utah keeps falling.   

KUER

Opponents and advocates of the Proposition 2 ballot initiative reach a  "shared vision" on medical marijuana legislation. Utah power brokers, including Utah Jazz owner Gail Miller, spend big money on ballot initiatives in the state. And Salt Lake City moves to rein in the environmental impacts of the inland port. 

Salt Lake Tribune

Utah leaders respond to the Senate hearings over sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Also, Prof. Anita Hill, who testified in remarkably similar hearings held 27 years ago, visits the University of Utah for a lecture on sexual harassment. And the LDS Church, House Speaker Greg Hughes and proponents of legalizing medical cannabis meet to draft medical marijuana legislation, should Proposition 2 fail in November or Gov. Gary Herbert call a special session.

Salt Lake Tribune

Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski says lawsuits are coming on the inland port because she believes the legislation that created it is unconstitutional. A Vernal detective walks a delicate line between enforcement and entrapment in sexual solicitation arrests. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints excommunicates a former LDS bishop who has been critical of one-on-one interviews between Mormon clergy and youths. And one of Elizabeth Smart's kidnappers is freed from prison. 

Deseret News

The Federal Election Commission raises questions about more than a million dollars in campaign donations brought in by Rep. Mia Love. Sensitive areas near Canyonlands National Park are auctioned off as part of the largest oil and gas BLM lease sale since the George W. Bush administration. Plus, Tribune reporter Kathy Stephenson talks with KCPW producer Emily Means about health code violations and foodborne-illness outbreaks at restaurants, after an estimated 650 diners at The New Yorker may have been exposed to hepatitis a. 

Fox 10 Phoenix

Senators Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee question Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh during contentious confirmation hearings. The race for Utah's Fourth Congressional District takes a negative turn, with Rep. Mia Love and Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams' recently launched campaign ads. And commercials attacking a medical marijuana ballot initiative are pulled from local airwaves following complaints that they were misleading. 

Salt Lake Tribune

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints opposes Utah's medical marijuana ballot initiative, but not the use of the drug under specific circumstances. Sen. Orrin Hatch and Rep. Chris Stewart respond to news about former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen. And though legal, private meetings held by subcommittees of the Inland Port Authority draw more criticism from the public over a lack of transparency. 

Quartz

A judge rules that San Juan County Commission candidate Willy Grayeyes be put back on the ballot after an elections official backdated a complaint against him. U.S.

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