communication

Baldomero Olivera

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about pain, but — as usual — we're approaching it from two very different points of view. One of our guests is a researcher whose discoveries about toxic snails could help lead to painkillers. The other is a health communications expert who studies the way people communicate about pain on social media. 

National Institutes of Health

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about why we don't do the things we know we should do. Why, for instance, don't we get as much sleep as we're supposed to? And why do we often withhold information from our doctors? 

National Geographic

Ellada Gamreklidze examines the ways in which the views of members of the Supreme Court move through time.

Blaine Giriffen studies how polar bears move through water.

Together, we’ll discuss the ways in which old data can offer new clues about our world.

The Language Of Ravens on Wild About Utah

Feb 23, 2018
The Common Raven
National Parks Service

I was three days downriver and hadn’t seen a soul since shoving my canoe away from the boat ramp outside of town. The only sounds accompanying my solitude were the white noise of rapid water and the echoes of thoughts pin-balling around my mind—that is, until the third morning when, stooped over the small, blue roar of my cook stove, I was startled by an unfamiliar sound. 

questacon.edu.au

According to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, 62% of adults get their news through social media, often from like-minded people they trust. One expert said there are a growing number of researchers who are focused on finding better ways to communicate their research.