Diabetes

James Joel, creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

This week on Undisciplined, we’re talking about the black market exchange of diabetes medications in the United States and the evolution of vocal traits of a small, nocturnal primate in Indonesia, with guests whose work is very different, but whose drive to ask and answer complicated questions is very much the same.

University of Utah Health

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about life hacks, including some that work — like do-it-yourself glucose balancing devices used by increasing numbers of individuals with diabetes — and some that don't, like the common practice of using weekends for recovery sleep. 

Diabetes Is Impacting More Than Humans

Nov 12, 2018
Maxwell Air Force Base

More than 29 million people have diabetes according to the Center for Disease Control, but diabetes is one of the leading health concerns for cats and dogs. A change in behavior could be one of the first signs.

Congress has approved $150 million annual for type 1 diabetes research through the Special Diabetes Program.
JDRF

Advocates of research to treat and cure Type 1 Diabetes are meeting with members of Congress this week. A Utah mother from Riverton is in Washington, D.C. to share her 13-year-old son's story. While there, Stacey Warnick will encourage continued federal funding for programs that she hopes will lead to a cure of the metabolic disease.

Barnes Family

Eleven-year-old Noah Barnes and his family are traveling across the country in the name of diabetes. But while his mom is driving the family car, Noah and his dad are walking ever mile from southern Florida to Washington State on foot. 

Snail Insulin Picks Up Speed For Diabetic Community

Sep 19, 2016
Baldomero Olivera

Snails are certainly sluggish and may seem unassuming, but some possess a powerful weapon: insulin. And this insulin may provide a sweet development for the diabetic community. Insulin is a component of some snail venoms, and scientists have discovered the insulin from these slow-moving creatures could provide a framework for developing a faster-acting treatment to help control blood sugar levels in the human body.