engineering

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Water is critical to Arizona's future, and the state's three public universities are challenging high school students to propose solutions for the water problems communities face around the state.

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Although the national election and COVID-19 pandemic continue to dominate the news cycle, there is other news out there — and the worlds of science, exploration and research are moving along with fascinating new discoveries.

We’re discussing ancient hibernation, tiny robot surgeons, a new kind of thermometer, and the world-changing power of CRISPR.

NOAA OKEANOS EXPLORER Program, Gulf of Mexico 2014 Expedition

All across the world’s oceans, you can find creatures known as larvaceans – free-swimming invertebrates with a superpower, of sorts. 

They make huge structures out of snot. 

And that might sound gross, but it turns out that there’s a lot we can learn from these animals, and this week we’ll talk to a researcher who has just made a breakthrough in our ability to do just that.

Pharmaceutical Journal

This week on UnDisciplined, we're going to chat with a scientist who is trying to solve a big challenge: engineering blood vessels for transplantation into human bodies. After that, we'll talk to a researcher who is trying to solve a challenge that might be even bigger: reducing gender pay disparities in corporate America. 

Bob Hubner / WSU

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about biofuels ... and tattoos. 

We're introducing an archaeologist and a chemical engineer, and if that doesn't already sound like a strange pairing, just consider what these guys study. 

Laurie Sparham/Miramax Films/Reuters

What do Judi Dench and Samuel L. Jackson have to do with ending crime waves and curing blindness? We'll find out this week when we're joined by guests Elizabeth Vargis and Sherry Towers. 

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Out in STEM at USU

Across the sciences, engineering is one of the least diverse disciplines. But Utah State University just received a grant to investigate LGBT+ representation in engineering.   

Background blue sky and white clouds. Middle stone bridge. Foreground two men in yellow jackets control a drone seeing in the middle.
Ascending Technologies

Like everything else, bridges are prone to wear and tear, often from environmental elements and constant use. New research out of Utah State University says the use of drones could help identify cracks, and ultimately extend the life of bridges.

Kevin Frayer / Getty Images

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the way newspapers impact the way people think, and the ways pollution impacts solar energy.

If those things sound like they have nothing in common — well, that's the idea.

Joining us are Alex Coppock, who studies how op-eds impact reader opinions, and Ian Marius Peters, who studies the impact of haze on energy production.

Smith and Garrett successfully transplanted a type IV CRISPR immune system into E. coli.
Mary-Ann Muffoletto/USU College of Science.

In the Jackson lab at Utah State University, mixers whirr, protein purification machines beep, and shakers jiggle, all with one goal: isolating and describing the bacterial immune systems known as CRISPR.

North Logan Pumpkin Toss Was A Smash

Oct 31, 2016
Carolyn Peacock

Northern Utah has a beautiful fall season.  Gentle breezes rustle the fallen leaves that gild the tranquil portrait of Cache Valley with deep reds and bright yellows.  Last Saturday began as another quiet study of autumnal repose, but then volleys of screeching pumpkins rained down from the sky like hellfire.

engineering.usu.edu

Christmas came early this year for participants of a non-profit outdoor adventures organization that provides persons with disabilities with adaptive equipment.