Extinction

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Insects have a reputation for “bugging” us humans with their bites, stings and incessant buzzing. While we may wish they would just go away, researchers have concerns about declining “bug biomass” and how it could impact us.

This week on Undisciplined, we’re talking about the long-lost woolly rhinoceros, Vikings, smallpox, and innovations in playground equipment. With a list of subjects that diverse, you might have guessed that the monthly science news round-up is back – and it is.

Background trees and tropical bushes. Small pond with two Hyrachyus, similar to tapir and rhino.
University of Utah

Millions of years ago there were diverse and large populations of mega-herbivores, but today there are only a few mega-herbivore species. New research reveals a new theory about the extinction of these ancient mega-herbivore species. 

Jacob Miller

On Tuesday, the Bureau of Land Management took bids for oil and gas leases on 154,212 acres of public land. This move was criticized by the Center for Biological Diversity, the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, and the Sierra Club for its potential to cause localized biodiversity loss. But how much can the loss of one or two species matter? 

Bear in the wilderness
Pixabay

Up to a third of the nation's wildlife species are at increased risk of extinction, according to a new report. In "Reversing America's Wildlife Crisis," National Wildlife Federation research shows more than 150 species are already extinct, and 500 more haven't been sighted in decades. 

Oceans Spared From Man-Made Extinction, For Now

Apr 3, 2017
https://oceansciencenow.wordpress.com/media-general-photos-in-support-of-oceansciencenow-stories/

There is not a lot of feel-good news to be found in the ecological sciences. Scientists did just discover a new population of canids in New Guinea thought to be extinct, but too often the stories sound more like this statement from Douglas McCauley, an assistant professor at the University of California in Santa Barbara.

conservewildlifenj.org

Humans may be the best "space invaders" on the planet. We cut down forests, build roadways, produce crops, and mine for minerals. These activities result in habitat loss for plants, animals, and other organisms and also pose a threat to biodiversity.