Glen Canyon

glencanyonexhibit.com

Iconic Utah outfitter Ken Sleight began his river-guiding career in Glen Canyon during the mid-1950s, just as the Glen Canyon Dam blueprints jumped from the drawing board to remote desert terrain. The pulse of the Colorado River through the canyon would soon be halted by a cement wall and Glen Canyon backfilled with water. Sleight knew the condition of the canyon was terminal.

City Weekly

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is rare bookseller Ken Sanders. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program. We’ll hear a segment from our conversation on the exhibit Glen Canyon: A River Guide Remembers. Then we’ll revisit a portion of our interview on poetry with Edward Hirsch and Michael Sowder.

A photo taken by Marshall Stewart, of a landscape pre-inundation
Martha Ham

  


 

Fifty-five years ago, the federal government began flooding a Utah canyon by building a dam. Water from the blocked Colorado River in Glen Canyon serves as a source of recreation on Lake Powell and produces hydropower for seven western states - Utah, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Wyoming.