Jason Gilmore

Twitter: @usubrazil

It’s UPR’s Fall Member Drive. We’ll be joined for the hour by USU Associate Professor of Communications Studies Jason Gilmore. And we’ll present parts of several recent Access Utah interviews.

Casper Star-Tribune

It’s been several days now of unrest, protests, and riots in many cities across the U.S. and the world (including Salt Lake City) since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25. We'll talk about it on Access Utah today.

Jason Gilmore

Jason Gilmore is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Utah State University. He recently traveled to Iowa and attended events presented by various Democratic presidential candidates, in attition to a Trump Rally as part of research for a book he is writing. 

Jason Gilmore

Jason Gilmore is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Utah State University. He recently traveled to Iowa and attended events presented by various Democratic presidential candidates. He spoke with Tom Williams on Monday ahead of today’s Iowa caucuses.

Jason Gilmore

 

Utah State University assistant professor Jason Gilmore is writing a book on President Donald Trump’s communication style and traveled to Iowa this week to attend some rallies before the state’s caucuses on Monday. 

UPR’s Tom Williams caught up with Jason on Friday after he added rallies for a few Democratic candiadtes. You can listen to part one, about the Trump Rally Gilmore attended, here.

Jason Gilmore

Utah State University assistant professor Jason Gilmore is writing a book on President Donald Trump’s communication style and traveled to Iowa this week to attend some rallies before the state’s caucuses on Monday. 

UPR’s Matilyn Mortensen caught up with Gilmore on Thursday evening after he and his co-author attended at Trump Rally. 

It’s anecdotal. But I think it’s a thing. I’m hearing from a growing number of people that they’re disengaging from the news and, in some cases, from politics. We’re going to talk about it next time on Access Utah. My guests will include USU Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Jason Gilmore; and University of Utah Law Professor RonNell Anderson Jones. And I’d love to get your perspective on this. You can email me right now to upraccess@gmail.com

Twitter: @usubrazil

On the first day of UPR’s Spring Pledge Drive Tom Williams and co-host USU Communications Studies Assistant Professor Jason Gilmore will present parts of several recent Access Utah interviews: We’ll hear some of our listeners expressing opposing viewpoints. StoryCorps founder David Isay will urge us to try to overcome our differences by truly listening to each other.

Twitter: @usubrazil

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Dr. Jason Gilmore, assistant professor of Communication Studies at Utah State Unviersity. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program.

King's Road: 50 Years Later, People Continue To Remember

Apr 10, 2018
Interviews during the 50th anniversary of MLK's assassination at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis.
Jason Gilmore

On April 4, 2018, the bells rang out in downtown Memphis, Tennessee, and around the world, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. being interviewed by the press.
Pixaby

On April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. found himself in Memphis, Tennessee to lend support to a sanitation workers’ strike.  

Salt Lake Tribune

We'll discuss the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia. We’ll ask if there should be any limits to free speech and assembly. What provisions should be made if the protesters are armed? Should ideas repugnant to most people be allowed expression? When such ideas are expressed what should the push-back look like? Is President Trump right to see an equivalence between the protesters and counter-protesters in Charlottesville? Regarding controversial monuments and memorials: How should we make decisions on what stays and what gets removed?