Marisela Martinez-Cola

Albert Herring / Tulane Public Relations

There is a lot of concern about the idea of teaching critical race theory in schools and how it could impact students. Last month, Utah’s State Legislature passed a resolution making recommendations to the Utah State Board of Education about critical race theory. But what is it and is it being taught in Utah?

USU Mountain West Center for Regional Studies

Almost one year ago in the midst of a global pandemic, we watched the death of George Floyd. Americans responded, protesting the realities of racial injustice in cities across the country. For many individuals, this may have been the first time they recognized the depth and breadth of discrimination in the United States, in their communities, and in their classrooms.

Shane Graham holding his book
Courtesy of Christy Fox


There are a number of book lists circulating social media to give audiences a better view of what it looks like to be Black in the United States. But according to one Utah State University professor, the idea of connecting audiences to Black culture reaches back nearly a century to American poet and author Langston Hughes’ international efforts. 

Can Elementary Students Fight Racism?

Jun 11, 2020
Black Lives Matter protest, Logan, Utah, George Floyd, Police Brutality, local 9-year-old wants racism to end with her generation
Kat Webb

People around the world watched as a Minneapolis police officer knelt on a man’s neck for nine minutes, ultimately killing George Floyd. The act sparked protests and even riots throughout the United States and abroad.

Casper Star-Tribune

It’s been several days now of unrest, protests, and riots in many cities across the U.S. and the world (including Salt Lake City) since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25. We'll talk about it on Access Utah today.

USU College of Humanities and Social Sciences

From Wikipedia: “Sylvia Mendez (born June 7, 1936) is an American civil rights activist of Mexican-Puerto Rican heritage. At age eight, she played an instrumental role in the Mendez v. Westminster case, the landmark desegregation case of 1946. The case successfully ended de jure segregation in California[1] and paved the way for integration and the American civil rights movement.[2]

PLoS Blogs

  A coalition of faculty and students at USU have come together to organize a day-long discussion of sexual violence, in order to understand the issues that informed the Kavanaugh hearings and investigation. This teach-in will happen on Tuesday, October 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the USU Anthropology Museum (Old Main 252) on the USU campus.