microbiology

CostaRica.Org

This week on UnDisiplined, we're joined for the second time by Karen Lloyd, whose work is helping us understand the relationship between microbes, carbon, and the deep Earth. 

We'll also be joined by Marcus Drymon of Mississippi State University, a marine fisheries ecologist whose recent work has been getting a lot of attention. 

WebMD

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking to researchers on two sides of a huge scientific challenge. Our first guest researches climate — that means she only has one test subject to work with: the Earth. Our second guest studies cancer, which presents differently in humans and other organisms. That means she has endless test subjects. 

University of Utah

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about scientific puzzles. For instance, why is it that hundreds of tree species can exist within a single acre of rainforest, but the same species is almost never found next to itself?

Or, here's another one: Why is it that individual animals from the same species — dogs, for instance — can exhibit such tremendously different traits when it comes to aggressiveness?

via Thrillist

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about big animals like wolves, bears and lions — and really tiny life forms, like yeast. 

By happenstance, we're joined by two researchers whose recent work comes out of the same university, but who are meeting for the first time on a public radio program recorded hundreds of miles from either one of them. 

Alan Levine / Flickr

Each week on UnDisciplined, we bring two researchers together to talk about their recent work. 

This week, we're joined first by Karen Lloyd, whose research suggests microbial dark matter may be all around us. Then, we talked to Jacob Freeman, who uses trash to study the synchronous rise and fall of societies.