midterms

Salt Lake Tribune

The dust is settling after the 2018 midterm elections. What does the future hold for the citizen ballot initiatives that passed? Plus, President Donald Trump lashes out at Rep. Mia Love. And Utah remembers North Ogden Mayor Brent Taylor, who was killed in an insider attack in Afghanistan. At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporter Brian Maffly, government and politics editor Dan Harrie and editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.

KSL TV

The midterm elections are (mostly) in the books. The Democrats took control of the U.S. House of Representatives and made some inroads in governorships and state legislatures. The Republicans expanded their majority in the U.S. Senate. In Utah, Mitt Romney became Senator-elect, the race for the 4th Congressional District is too close to call. Several of the Propositions on the ballot appear headed for passage. And turnout was extremely high. We recap the elections and look ahead with Damon Cann, USU Professor of Political Science.

Daily Herald

Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes holds a public meeting to discuss the medical cannabis compromise legislation he crafted with proponents and opponents of Proposition 2. Also, due to high drug costs, a Utah health insurance group is paying for public employees to fill prescriptions in Mexico. And the local faith community responds to the recent shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue. 

wkyt.com

Record numbers of women are running for office and engaged in the political process this year. We’ll ask why? And is this temporary or a lasting trend? What will all this mean this year and going forward? As a part of the UPR Original Series, Utah Women 20/20, we’ll discuss these issues on Wednesday’s Access Utah.

Salt Lake Tribune

Tragedy strikes at the University of Utah when a student athlete is murdered on campus, approximately one year after the shooting death of another student at the University. A debate between candidates for Utah's 3rd Congressional District reveals stark differences in the race. And members of the Ute Mountain Ute tribe express concern about water pollution near the Utah uranium mill that abuts the town of White Mesa.  

KUER

Rep. Mia Love says the Federal Election Commission has cleared her of illegal fundraising and that her challenger, Ben McAdams, is unethical and should withdraw from the race. Also, four women ask the Utah Supreme Court to assign a special prosecutor to sexual assault cases that the Salt Lake County District Attorney's office declined to pursue. And the story of an unsolved murder from 1978 shows how evidence is maintained--and how cold cases are investigated today.  At 9 a.m.

Fox 13

Scott Howell and Thomas Wright, co-chairs of the Utah Debate Commission will join me to talk about the debates, which are airing on Utah Public Radio, and the political climate in Utah and the nation as we head into the midterm elections, now less than three weeks away. Scott Howell is a former state senator and senate minority leader, and candidate for the U.S. Senate. Howell is CEO Howell Consulting Group and a retired IBM Executive. Thomas Wright is former chairman of the Utah Republican Party and current President & Principal Broker, Summit Sotheby’s International Realty.

Deseret News

The Federal Election Commission raises questions about more than a million dollars in campaign donations brought in by Rep. Mia Love. Sensitive areas near Canyonlands National Park are auctioned off as part of the largest oil and gas BLM lease sale since the George W. Bush administration. Plus, Tribune reporter Kathy Stephenson talks with KCPW producer Emily Means about health code violations and foodborne-illness outbreaks at restaurants, after an estimated 650 diners at The New Yorker may have been exposed to hepatitis a. 

Salt Lake Tribune

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints opposes Utah's medical marijuana ballot initiative, but not the use of the drug under specific circumstances. Sen. Orrin Hatch and Rep. Chris Stewart respond to news about former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen. And though legal, private meetings held by subcommittees of the Inland Port Authority draw more criticism from the public over a lack of transparency.