Native Americans


Something exciting today: a live episode of the podcast DEBUNKED which seeks to dispel harmful myths and stereotypes about people who use drugs, persons in recovery, and evidenced-based harm reduction efforts. Today we’ll debunk the myth; Native Americans only live on reservations. Our guests are: Sandy Sulzer, Director of the Office of Health Equity and Community Engagement at USU; Kristina Groves, LCSW, Ute/Hopi Tribe, Therapist at Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake; and podcast host Don Lyons.

Harriet Cornachione / Utah State University Department of Geosciences

As part of the seventh Utah State University Native American Summer Mentorship program last week, a cultural competency course for faculty was offered to help students receive the support they need on a long-term basis.

In episode six, we are debunking the myth “Native Americans have a predisposition to addiction.”

Idaho State Journal

This year marks the 157th anniversary of the largest massacre of Native Americans in the United States.

Bears Ears National Monument; Southern utah
Mark Stevens / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/


As the appointed committee for the management of Bears Ears National Monument meets for the first time today, stakeholders hope they can agree on the monument’s future. But for tribal advocates of the monument, they don’t believe the committee itself was fairly chosen.

newpages.com

Growing up in a gang in the city can be dark. Growing up Native American in a gang in Chicago is a whole different story. This book takes a trip through that unexplored part of Indian Country, an intense journey that is full of surprises, shining a light on the interior lives of people whose intellectual and emotional concerns are often overlooked. This dark, compelling, occasionally inappropriate, and often hilarious linked story collection introduces a character who defies all stereotypes about urban life and Indians. He will be in readers’ heads for a long time to come. 

Amazon

Author and ethnographer Rodney Frey won the 2018 Evans Handcart Award from Utah State University's Mountain West Center for Regional Studies for his book Carry Forth the Stories: An Ethnographer’s Journey into Native Oral Tradition (Washington State University Press, 2017).  

Amazon

The received idea of Native American history–as promulgated by books like Dee Brown’s mega-bestselling 1970 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee–has been that American Indian history essentially ended with the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee. Not only did one hundred fifty Sioux die at the hands of the U. S. Cavalry, the sense was, but Native civilization did as well.

newpages.com

Growing up in a gang in the city can be dark. Growing up Native American in a gang in Chicago is a whole different story. This book takes a trip through that unexplored part of Indian Country, an intense journey that is full of surprises, shining a light on the interior lives of people whose intellectual and emotional concerns are often overlooked. This dark, compelling, occasionally inappropriate, and often hilarious linked story collection introduces a character who defies all stereotypes about urban life and Indians.

Amazon

Utah State University’s Mountain West Center for Regional Studies has announced the 2018 winners of the Evans Biography Awards for books published in 2017. Author and ethnographer Rodney Frey won the Evans Handcart Award for his book Carry Forth the Stories: An Ethnographer’s Journey into Native Oral Tradition (Washington State University Press, 2017).  

Design Sponge

In 2012, photographer Matika Wilbur sold everything in her Seattle apartment and created Project 562, which reflects her commitment to visit, engage with and photograph all 562 plus Native American sovereign territories in the United States. With this project she has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles, many in her RV (which she has nicknamed the “Big Girl”) but also by horseback through the Grand Canyon, by train, plane, and boat and on foot across all 50 states.

True West Magazine

After oil was discovered beneath their land in the 1920's, the richest people per capita were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. They rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions and sent their children to study in Europe. 

 

According to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Native Americans continue to be one of the most underrepresented groups in the Census of Agriculture. While more producers are participating every year, much of the data is still missing.

upr.org

A Native American advocacy group is making a long shot request for an independent expert with the United Nations Human Rights Council to order the United States to respond to ongoing human right violations it says are happening at Bears Ears National Monument.

The Deseret News reported Tuesday that Utah Dine Bikeyah leaders say ongoing grave robbing and looting of cultural artifacts merit action and intervention. The group didn't provide any statistics to back the claim in its official letter.

matikawilbur.com

In 2012, photographer Matika Wilbur sold everything in her Seattle apartment and created Project 562, which reflects her commitment to visit, engage with and photograph all 562 plus Native American sovereign territories in the United States. With this project she has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles, many in her RV (which she has nicknamed the “Big Girl”) but also by horseback through the Grand Canyon, by train, plane, and boat and on foot across all 50 states.

Logo for the Native American Rights Fund, who is fighting for voting rights for Indian Country.
narf.org

Election sites far from reservations. Poll workers who don't speak tribal languages. Unequal access to early voting sites.

Native Americans say they've encountered a wide range of obstacles that makes voting difficult.

San Juan County, Utah, highlighted in red on a Utah state map
ilovehistory.utah.gov

A federal judge is approving new county election districts in southeastern Utah after finding the boundaries discriminated against American Indians who make up roughly half the population. The new San Juan County voting districts are designed to give native residents an equal voice in local races, but commissioner Phil Lyman said Friday they are unfair and the county plans to appeal.

Matika Wilbur is the photographer behind Project 562. When she came to Utah State University on Nov. 15, it was the 37th university she had spoken at that month. The project, named for the 562 federally recognized U.S. tribes she initially planned to visit, is dedicated to changing the way we see Native America.

Kyle Todecheene / The Utah Statesman

  

The Wellsville City Council recently formed a committee to make changes regarding the battle re-enactment, which originally involved white citizens dressing up as Native Americans and re-enacting a version of the Bear River Massacre that Native Americans say is historically inaccurate.

Ka-Voka Jackson

As you float down the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam to Lake Mead you may not realize that river right, the north side of the river, is owned and managed by the National Park Service and river left is managed by several groups including the Hualapai and Havasupai Indian nations.

in.newshub.org

A Native American tribe wants a small northern Utah city to get rid of an annual battle reenactment that features people dressed as American Indians raiding an encampment of white settlers.

The Northwest Band of the Shoshone Nation has told Wellsville city officials that the so-called "Sham Battle" is a racially and culturally insensitive portrayal of Native Americans.

pbs.org

Western Democrats are pressuring President Donald Trump not to rescind land protections put in place by President Barack Obama, including for Utah's Bears Ears National Monument.