New Research

Earth.com

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about risk reduction. 

First, we'll talk to a researcher who wants to know how to get people who are at risk of skin cancer to stay out of the sun. Then we'll chat with a scientist who believes a simple drop of medicine under the tongue could protect children who have peanut allergies. 

Peter Dazeley / Getty Images

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about two ideas that fly in the face of conventional thought. One of our guests will tell us about the creatures in our gut — bacteria. The other will talk about an idea in many of our heads about how fake news impacts the political process.

KPFA

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking to a researcher who's demonstrated that some insects may actually benefit from pesticides. Then, we'll chat with a string theorist who is uncoupling ideas about the universe faster than you can say "Nikulin involution."

Andrew Sutton / Shutterstock via BBC Earth

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about movement. Our first guest is a scientist whose research is helping us understand the ways the world's largest animal moves its body. Our second guest is a researcher whose recent studies uncover the ways animals are moved as part of complex global trafficking networks. 

Phys.Org

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the shape of the Milky Way Galaxy, life on the Moon, a poorly-timed tweet, and the potential impact of artificial intelligence on Hollywood. That's right, it's time for the monthly science news roundup! 

Javier Luque via Twitter

For more than a year now, we've been bringing together researchers from different disciplines in our never-ending search to build interdisciplinary connections. That's a lot of researchers, who are all doing a lot of really fascinating work — but we haven't had a paleontologist on our program yet. So today, that's going to change. 

BBC

There's no way we could let this month pass us by without talking about the 50th anniversary of one of the greatest scientific achievements of all time: the moon landing. But don't worry, we won't get stuck in the past. 

Getty Images

Do you know what kills more women during and after pregnancy than anything else? The answer is probably going to surprise you. And do you have a pretty good understanding of how evolution works? If so, we might have another surpirse for you. 

Earth.com

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the way dolphins survive in captivity, and the way humans make decisions based on the chemicals in their bodies. 

Phys.Org

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about how things start. 

First, we'll be joined by a physical scientist who's uncovered a secret about how water begins to freeze.

Then, we'll chat with a health scientist who will tell us about how to start a revolution in healthy behaviors.

Joining us in studio is Valeria Molinero, a professor of theoretical chemistry at the University of Utah. Her team's recent study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society explains how tiny proteins control the initial formation of ice at various temperatures that are almost never exactly 32 degrees. 

Also joining us, from Calgary, Alberta, where she is an epidemiologist whose work focuses on the role of energy balance in cancer prevention, is Lin Yang. Her team's recent work shows that despite health warnings, Americans still spend way too much time sitting.  

PetMD

This week on UnDisciplined, we've gathered two of our favorite fellow science geeks to talk about the headlines that caught our eyes in June — and a few we wish would have gotten more attention. 

Pharmaceutical Journal

This week on UnDisciplined, we're going to chat with a scientist who is trying to solve a big challenge: engineering blood vessels for transplantation into human bodies. After that, we'll talk to a researcher who is trying to solve a challenge that might be even bigger: reducing gender pay disparities in corporate America. 

University of Utah

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about scientific puzzles. For instance, why is it that hundreds of tree species can exist within a single acre of rainforest, but the same species is almost never found next to itself?

Or, here's another one: Why is it that individual animals from the same species — dogs, for instance — can exhibit such tremendously different traits when it comes to aggressiveness?

Emanuele Biggi via Amphibian and Reptile Conservation

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about some pretty scary things. 

Baldomero Olivera

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about pain, but — as usual — we're approaching it from two very different points of view. One of our guests is a researcher whose discoveries about toxic snails could help lead to painkillers. The other is a health communications expert who studies the way people communicate about pain on social media. 

via Thrillist

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about big animals like wolves, bears and lions — and really tiny life forms, like yeast. 

By happenstance, we're joined by two researchers whose recent work comes out of the same university, but who are meeting for the first time on a public radio program recorded hundreds of miles from either one of them. 

The Indian Express

This week on UnDisciplined, we're gathering up a motley gang of science geeks to talk about some of the biggest stories in science over the past few weeks. 

Gizmodo

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the ways computers help people do things better. 

One of our guests studies the way video games can be used to build better workplaces. Our other guest researches how artificial intelligence can help us tell better jokes — that's right, better jokes. 

Gail McCormick / Penn State

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about stress, but from two very different scientific points of view. 

Getty Images

In UnDisciplined's first ever monthly science news roundup, we're joined by three researchers, plus a fellow science enthusiast, to take a look at recent science news through a bunch of different perspectives. 

National Institutes of Health

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about why we don't do the things we know we should do. Why, for instance, don't we get as much sleep as we're supposed to? And why do we often withhold information from our doctors? 

Catarata Films

We're talking about the ways warfare can build bonds in tribal societies, and how air pollution can have devastating effects in our modern world. 

Genetic Literacy Project

This week on UnDisciplined, we're joined by a scientist who helped create a transgenic mouse that can help us understand the human relationship with a vital molecule. We'll also chat with a researcher who just announced the discovery of nearly 50 new species right here in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. 

Chris Bunker / The Daily Universe

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about really small things, like cell cultures and their effect on research, and really big things, like our planet's climate and its effect on human movement. 

A puffy white dandelion head disintegrates in the wind in front of a blue sky.
Britannica

According to the new research from Utah State University, how a plant disperses its seeds is related to other life history strategies. 

Seed dispersal is the movement or transportation of seeds away from the parent plant.