Plants

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants and Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses. She lives in Syracuse, New York, where she is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology, and the founder and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment.

World Agriculture Network

We’ve all heard the terms ‘organic’ and ‘sustainable’ agriculture, but what do those descriptions really mean?

Utah Public Radio explores this question with soil scientist Jennifer Reeve. She presents “What is Organic and Sustainable Agriculture, Anyway?” on Monday, July 15th. 

Two New Wildflower Species Discovered In Logan Canyon

Dec 21, 2018
Leslie Forero

You would think that scientists would know how many species occur in an area, especially one as well-populated as Cache County. But scientists at Utah State University just discovered two new species of wildflowers that only occur near Logan – and they think more are out there.

Plants taxonomy identification
Intermountain Herbarium, Utah State University

If you’re a scientist studying any kind of plant or animal species, you’ve probably come across Symbiota. But, if you’re like me and that’s not your cup of tea, you may have never heard of it.

Montana wildlife.
Wilderness.org

The head of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is stepping down after a 16-month tenure in which he proposed broad changes to rules governing protections for thousands of plant and animal species.

Spokesman Gavin Shire said Thursday that Greg Sheehan will step down next week to return to his family and home in Utah.

A puffy white dandelion head disintegrates in the wind in front of a blue sky.
Britannica

According to the new research from Utah State University, how a plant disperses its seeds is related to other life history strategies. 

Seed dispersal is the movement or transportation of seeds away from the parent plant.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife

As human populations increase and construction developments overtake agricultural land and wildlife habitat, some people may feel as if there is little hope for local connections to nature.  Don’t raise the white flag of surrender.  There is much you can do in your own yards to help attract wild songbirds and butterflies.

Paul Wolf / Intermountain Herbarium

In a basement below a cafeteria, researchers and scientists gather in what is the Intermountain Herbarium.  It is a little used Utah State University campus resource that serves an important purpose.

Andrew Kulmatiski / Utah State University

For sagebrush lovers, fire is scary.  It destroys the native shrubs, grasses and wildflowers, leaving cheatgrass in its wake. Cheatgrass displaces native seedlings, destroys wildlife habitat, and increases the chances that fire will reoccur.  

Thorsten Becker / Wikimedia

In the Namib Desert of southern Africa, strange circles dot the landscape as regularly as polka-dots on a dress. The bare spots are ringed by lush grass. These structures are known as fairy circles.  The fairy circles repeat for miles – and how they came to be is hotly debated. Scientists are divided regarding their origin:  animal or vegetable?

Algae As A Source Food For Livestock

Sep 28, 2015
Diego Mendiola

Friday, in a follow up to Growing Algae From Fracking Wastewater As A Biofuel, the research team at USU is finding new ways to feed the world as well, they have found that algae is high in protein and in nutrients.

 

In a small, shanty greenhouse a churning machine spins disks and barrels covered in black green colored algae. The researchers here are testing the most efficient way of growing these multipurpose organisms.

Utah’s mountains and foothills blaze with the brilliant foliar colors of aspens, maples, sumacs and more. But autumn colors can be found in less likely habitats too, even across our flat, desolate salt pans. There the usually drab stage has been given a splash of deep, dusty rose color by its sole botanical performers, the pickleweeds.