Race

PBS FRONTLINE

With police shootings in Utah reaching record highs amid a nationwide debate over police accountability, FRONTLINE and The Salt Lake Tribune are presenting Shots Fired: the first nationally broadcast documentary stemming from FRONTLINE’s Local Journalism Initiative.

Shots Fired, which premiered on PBS, examines police training, tactics, and accountability, as well as racial disparities in the way force is used and looks at the circumstances surrounding several tragic police shootings in Utah, and the laws governing use of force in the state.

Loudoun Times-Mirror


Quoting the Salt Lake Tribune: “In response to the uproar over critical race theory, the Utah Board of Education has approved a new set of standards that spell out what teachers can — and especially what they cannot — say to their students about ethnicity, inclusion, equity and culture.” The Utah Legislature has also passed resolutions on the topic. Today we’ll try to define what Critical Race Theory is and isn’t and talk about what should and shouldn’t be taught in Utah’s K-12 schools. 

Amazon

History isn’t always written by the victors. 19th century America saw a series of high-profile court cases that stripped civil rights from Black Americans following the Civil War. John Marshall Harlan was the only U.S. Supreme Court justice to stand in dissent, and his blistering, passionate rebuttals inspired future justices, such as Thurgood Marshall, who said that Harlan’s writings were his “Bible” and his blueprint as he helped to tear down Segregation a century later.

libbycopeland.com

In a recent op-ed in the New York Times, titled “America’s Brutal Racial History Is Written All Over Our Genes,” Libby Copeland writes: “The debate around race consuming America right now is coinciding with a technological phenomenon — at-home genetic testing kits — revealing many of us are not who we thought we were. Some customers of the major DNA testing companies, which collectively have sold 37 million of these kits, are getting results that surprise them.”

USU Mountain West Center for Regional Studies

Almost one year ago in the midst of a global pandemic, we watched the death of George Floyd. Americans responded, protesting the realities of racial injustice in cities across the country. For many individuals, this may have been the first time they recognized the depth and breadth of discrimination in the United States, in their communities, and in their classrooms.

paisleyrekdal.com


In 2019, Utah Poet Laureate Paisley Rekdal was commissioned to write a poem commemorating the 150th anniversary of the transcontinental railroad’s completion. The result is “West: A Translation:” a linked collection of poems that responds to a Chinese elegy carved into the walls of the Angel Island Immigration Station where Chinese migrants to the United States were detained. “West” translates this elegy character by character through the lens of Chinese and other transcontinental railroad workers’ histories, and through the railroad’s cultural impact on America.

University of Utah College of Humanities

How do we properly define cultural appropriation, and is it always wrong? If we can write in the voice of another, should we? And if so, what questions do we need to consider first?

ABA Journal


In the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, charged in the death of George Floyd the verdict is in: guilty on all charges. Our guests today include Darlene McDonald, of the Utah Black Roundtable and a member of the Salt Lake City Commission on Racial Equity in Policing; Rep. Sandra Hollins, D-Salt Lake City; and Rep. Angela Romero, D-Salt Lake City.

Twitter: @usubrazil

It’s UPR’s Spring Member Drive. On Access Utah that means some very special programming, including some Best Of segments from favorite episodes and some great new conversations. On Wednesday’s Access Utah we’re talking about bridging racial and political divides. How do we talk to each other, understand each other, connect with each other when the divides only seem to be deepening? Our guest for the hour is Jason Gilmore, Associate Professor of Global Communication at Utah State University.

InclusionPro

The Utah Women’s Giving Circle presented their “Resilient 2020 Speaker Series | From Susan B. Anthony to RBG: The history, resilience and call to community.” The concluding event in the series was held in November 2020, and was titled “New Possibilities Amidst the Unraveling.” Sara Jones, CEO of InclusionPro talked about how to identify opportunities in the midst of turmoil. She reminded us that unraveling our expectations gives us space, freedom, and clear eyes to see things differently. 

InclusionPro

The Utah Women’s Giving Circle is presenting their “Resilient 2020 Speaker Series | From Susan B. Anthony to RBG: The history, resilience and call to community.” The concluding event in the series is on Thursday and is titled “New Possibilities Amidst the Unraveling” Sara Jones, CEO of InclusionPro will talk about how to identify opportunities in the midst of turmoil. She will remind us that unraveling our expectations gives us space, freedom, and clear eyes to see things differently. 

Twitter: @usubrazil

It’s UPR’s Fall Member Drive. We’ll be joined for the hour by USU Associate Professor of Communications Studies Jason Gilmore. And we’ll present parts of several recent Access Utah interviews.

Utah State Today

Renowned American political activist, scholar and author Ibram X. Kendi visited USU in 2017 for a keynote presentation on “How to be an Anti-Racist.” The presentation was sponsored by the USU Inclusion Center.

Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune

The ongoing protests in Salt Lake City sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneaopolis. Black Utahns ask for policy changes locally to address systemic racism. And Utah’s ‘sharp spike’ in COVID-19 cases - with a related jump in hospitalizations. 

Casper Star-Tribune

It’s been several days now of unrest, protests, and riots in many cities across the U.S. and the world (including Salt Lake City) since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25. We'll talk about it on Access Utah today.

USU College of Humanities and Social Sciences

From Wikipedia: “Sylvia Mendez (born June 7, 1936) is an American civil rights activist of Mexican-Puerto Rican heritage. At age eight, she played an instrumental role in the Mendez v. Westminster case, the landmark desegregation case of 1946. The case successfully ended de jure segregation in California[1] and paved the way for integration and the American civil rights movement.[2]

Utah State University

  Crystal Marie Fleming, Ph.D. is an author, public intellectual and expert on white supremacy and global racism. She is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook University with affiliations in the Department of Africana Studies and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Dr.

USU College of Humanities and Social Sciences

From Wikipedia: “Sylvia Mendez (born June 7, 1936) is an American civil rights activist of Mexican-Puerto Rican heritage. At age eight, she played an instrumental role in the Mendez v. Westminster case, the landmark desegregation case of 1946. The case successfully ended de jure segregation in California[1] and paved the way for integration and the American civil rights movement.[2]

Lyric Repertory Company

The New York Times calls A Raisin in the Sun “the play that changed American theater forever.” In this play, Hansberry - a pioneering, female, African-American playwright - covers issues of racism, discrimination, generational clashes, civil rights, and the women’s movement through the divergent dreams and conflicts within three generations of the Younger family. The Younger family’s heroic struggle to retain dignity in a harsh and changing world is a searing and timeless document of hope and inspiration.

Amazon

In his memoir, “The Weight of Shadows,” José Orduña chronicles the process of becoming a North American citizen in a post-9/11 United States. Intractable realities—rooted in the continuity of US imperialism to globalism—form the landscape of Orduña’s daily experience, where the geopolitical meets the quotidian. In one anecdote, he recalls how the only apartment his parents could rent was one that didn’t require signing a lease or running a credit check, where the floors were so crooked he once dropped an orange and watched it roll in six directions before settling in a corner.

Weber School District Logo
owcap.org

Weber School District is overhauling the way it deals with racism and discrimination with new policies and plans to hire a new administrator to focus on the issues.

School officials say they want to change the culture at the district, both in the ways they deal with specific instances and in encouraging students to speak out if they see something that isn't right.

HLS Orgs

Our guest for the hour is Ann Burroughs, president and CEO of the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles and newly elected chair of the Global Assembly of Amnesty Interational. She gave the keynote speech for the Tanner Center for Human Rights lecture series on August 30th at the University of Utah. The title of her lecture was "Never Again is Now: Remembering and Reaffirming Our Collective Commitment to Protecting Civil Rights."

Deseret News

This year’s Leonard J. Arrington Mormon History Lecture will be presented by Darius Gray. The lecture, titled “Redeeming a People: The Critical Role of Historical Examination in Moving Cultural and Moral Trajectories,” is 7 p.m. today at the Logan Tabernacle, 50 N. Main St. The evening’s events will also include performances by the Deborah Bonner Unity Gospel Choir.

Twitter: @usubrazil

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Dr. Jason Gilmore, assistant professor of Communication Studies at Utah State Unviersity. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program.

Children playing; U of U professor discusses how to talk about race with children.
Pixino.com

A recent article published by the University of Utah features 10 tips for talking with children about race. UPR’s Matilyn Mortensen visited with author Karen Tao about her research and her recommendations for talking to children about differences.

Utah Is Third Worst State For Voter Representation

Oct 10, 2016
blog.riosalado.edu

During the 2012 presidential election, Utah was the third worst state for voter representation, according to an analysis by the financial company WalletHub.

"There's ... too many of them," a Y-wing pilot says as Imperial ships overwhelm the Rebel fleet in the climactic space battle in Return of the Jedi.

This scene is important because we've just learned that the Rebels have been lured to the forest moon Endor by the Emperor — it's a trap! It's also important for another reason: This is the first line spoken by an Asian character in the original Star Wars movies.