social media

Dani Hayes | Utah Public Radio

On this special pledge drive edition of Access Utah. My co-host is Access Utah founding host and former UPR Program Director Lee Austin. We’ll feature new conversations with USU Associate Professor of Journalism Matthew LaPlante and BBC host Dan Damon. We’ll be talking about the media landscape in the U.S. and the U.K. We’ll also talk about all the latest twists and turns in the Brexit saga.

 

Baldomero Olivera

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about pain, but — as usual — we're approaching it from two very different points of view. One of our guests is a researcher whose discoveries about toxic snails could help lead to painkillers. The other is a health communications expert who studies the way people communicate about pain on social media. 

Getty Images

In UnDisciplined's first ever monthly science news roundup, we're joined by three researchers, plus a fellow science enthusiast, to take a look at recent science news through a bunch of different perspectives. 

Russell M. Nelson
lds.org

Some woman candidates for public office, who are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, are worried that a recommended social media break could hurt their campaigns.

Russell M. Nelson, the president of the church, has challenged women of the faith to take a 10-day break from social media, "and from any other media that bring negative and impure thoughts to your mind."

Trolls (2016)

Amanda Subalusky studies how ecosystems are impacted by migrating wildebeests in Africa. Candi Carter Olson's research focuses on how communities of interest use the media to get their messages heard. Together, we talk about gnus and the news.

Aaron Johnson filed lawsuits after the Salt Lake City's city council Facebook page blocked him from posting on their wall.
open-scout.org

  A Utah man has filed a pair of lawsuits claiming state and Salt Lake City officials have violated his free speech rights by blocking him on social media.

Aaron Johnson says he enjoys ribbing politicians online.

801Rocks

Mental health can be difficult to discuss, which is why McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden wanted a more approachable way to address the topic. 

 

A new study by Joseph Grenny and David Maxfield, co-authors of four New York Times bestsellers on interpersonal communication and influencing human behavior, reveals that more and more of us are losing connection with our lives in order to earn “likes” and social media praise. We have, in a sense, turned into social media “trophy hunters.”

Pexels

On January 18, experts in mental health, suicide prevention and social media met with military officials at the Pentagon to discuss how social media can find individuals at risk for suicide and offer them help and resources.