Terry Messmer

Rebirth Of Spring For Animals And Humans

May 25, 2019
Pixabay - Skeeze

For most wild animals, spring is the time of year when the seasonal cycle is renewed.  Spring birthing and nesting is adaptive in that the young are born when the conditions are favorable, and food resource is most abundant, increasing the chance of survival.  While some learn survival from one or both parents, others normally receive little or no parental care. 

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The State of Utah and the Bureau of Land Management recently revised plans to restore and manage populations of Greater Sage Grouse in the Intermountain West — and researchers say this time, they got it right.

Human-Wildlife Interactions

May 13, 2019
Pixabay - skeeze

In 1999 I presented a paper on the status of human-wildlife conflict at an annual meeting of the international biodeterioration and biodegradation society.  The paper was entitled The emergence of wildlife conflict management, turning challenges into opportunities.

Pixabay

In recent weeks the popular press and social media has picked up on reports of an infectious disease in deer known as chronic wasting disease. CWD has now been confirmed in 24 states including Utah. Some experts quoted in the media have dubbed the deer afflicted with this disease as “zombie deer” because they believe the disease could one day affect human beings. 

Pixabay

Knock-knock! Who’s there? Recently, some Utah homeowners who live near wooded areas have awakened to mysterious knocking sounds in their walls. The source of the knocking has been identified as a species of bird known as a woodpecker. Those who may choose to ignore the knocking might be in for a surprise this spring when they find that the woodpecker has taken up residency within the wall.

Ode To A Christmas Mouse

Dec 23, 2018

Tis the night before Christmas when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse. These are the opening lines of the poem entitled, The Night Before Christmas. Charles Moore wrote the poem for his family on Christmas Eve in 1822.

Pixabay

Halloween’s scariest animals. Bats are mammals that fly. But it was Bram Stokers “Dracula” that forever linked bats to vampires on Halloween.