Tom Williams

Tom Williams here with the Utah State University President Noelle Cockett with our weekly conversation here at UPR. President Cockett, thank you for joining us again. 


Tom Williams here. I have with me on the line Utah State University President Noelle Cockett. President Cockett, thanks, as always, for joining us.


Tom Williams here with Utah State University President Noelle Cockett with our weekly conversation here at Utah Public Radio. President Cockett, thanks so much for joining us.


Tom Williams here with Utah State University President Noelle Cockett. President Cockett, thanks for joining us again.

Tom Williams here with Utah State University President Noelle Cockett. President Cockett, thanks for taking some time again with us today.

Join UPR for a special Access Utah program Thursday, January 14th at 7pm. Susan Albert Loewenberg, the founder and Producing Director of L.A. Theatre Works, will join UPR's Tom Williams to discuss the process of producing the L.A. Theatre Works national broadcast series. 

IN PLAIN SIGHT NEWS

A team from the University of Southern California has embarked on a 50-state tour to give cybersecurity training to poll workers and state and local campaign staffers who will be the last line of defense against Russian hacking in 2020. The group, called the Election Cybersecurity Initiative, views itself as a bottom-up, grass-roots counterpart to national-level election security efforts led by the Department of Homeland Security in the wake of Russia’s election interference in 2016.” (Washington Post January 30, 2020)

Americans Who Tell The Truth

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and Teaching of Plants, and Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses. She lives in Syracuse, New York, where she is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology, and the founder and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment.

Jason Gilmore

Jason Gilmore is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Utah State University. He recently traveled to Iowa and attended events presented by various Democratic presidential candidates, in attition to a Trump Rally as part of research for a book he is writing. 

Jason Gilmore

Jason Gilmore is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Utah State University. He recently traveled to Iowa and attended events presented by various Democratic presidential candidates. He spoke with Tom Williams on Monday ahead of today’s Iowa caucuses.

StoryCorps

As we bring our One Small Step series to a close, we would like to say thank you to everyone who took this journey with us. Listening is an act of love, and saying "thank you" will never go out of style.

UPR

On opening day of the 2019 Utah Legislature we’re at the State Capitol. We’ll speak with Utah Governor Gary Herbert; Senate Majority Leader Evan Vickers; Senate Minority Leader Karen Mayne; House Executive Appropriations Chair Brad Last and House Minority Leader Brian King. We’ll discuss propositions approved by the voters last year on medical marijuana, medicaid expansion, and redistricting. We’ll also talk about air quality, education, the budget, taxes and more.

 

Amazon

All her life, Emily felt different from other kids. Between therapist visits, sudden uncontrollable bursts of anger, and unexplained episodes of dizziness, things never felt right. For years, her only escape was through the stories she crafted. It wasn’t until a near-fatal accident when she was twelve years old that Emily and her family discovered the truth: a grapefruit-size brain tumor at the base of her skull.

UPR

Utah Valley University professor Susan Madsen has been focusing for several years now on helping more women graduate from college and helping more girls and women in Utah become leaders in their organizations and communities. She is the founder and director of the Utah Women & Leadership Project at UVU.  

Simon & Schuster

On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more.

National Park Service

Today on Access Utah: As the federal government shutdown continues with no end in sight, we talk about its effects in Utah. We look at effects on government employees and how the shutdown is affecting Utah’s national parks, among other topics. And we want to hear from you. Is the shutdown affecting you? What do you think should be done? Continue the conversation at upraccess@gmail.com.

Amazon

New York Times bestselling historian H. W. Brands’ latest book is “Heirs of the Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun and Daniel Webster, The Second Generation of American Giants” It tells the riveting story of how, in nineteenth-century America, a new set of political giants battled to complete the unfinished work of the Founding Fathers and decide the future of our democracy.

Wikimedia Commons

The holiday season is time for special music old and new. It’s also time for wonderful stories humorous and poignant. We’ll hear music for the season performed by the Lightwood Duo (Mike Christiansen on guitar and Eric Nelson on clarinet). We’ll also hear readings for the season by the author of The Christmas Chronicles, playwright Tim Slover.

  

Walter Link and Miriam Wollaeger, a young geologist couple in 1920s Wisconsin, set out to find oil to supply the surging U.S. demand. This exciting work will allow them to build their lives in South and Central America, Indonesia, and Cuba. But from the first posting in Columbia, they quickly discover that no women are working in the field in these places. While Walter faces the hardships and thrills of exploration in the jungles and mountains, and eventually becomes chief geologist for Standard Oil, Miriam is left behind in the colonial capitals during Walter’s often lengthy times away.

This is a unique moment for Utah. Five colleges and universities in the state now have women presidents, several for the first time. These institutions include Utah State University, University of Utah, Utah Valley University, Salt Lake Community College, and Westminster College. As a part of our UPR Original Series Utah Women 20/20, we’ll talk with three of those presidents on Monday’s Access Utah. We’ll explore what this means for Utah and for these universities and colleges.

chelseagreen.com

In Eager, environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb reveals that our modern idea of what a healthy landscape looks like and how it functions is wrong, distorted by the fur trade that once trapped out millions of beavers from North America’s lakes and rivers. The consequences of losing beavers were profound: streams eroded, wetlands dried up, and species from salmon to swans lost vital habitat.

Amazon

Throughout its history, America has been defined through maps. Whether made for military strategy or urban reform, to encourage settlement or to investigate disease, maps invest information with meaning by translating it into visual form. They capture what people knew, what they thought they knew, what they hoped for, and what they feared. As such they offer unrivaled windows onto the past.

danieljamesbrown.com

Daniel James Brown’s bestseller “The Boys in the Boat” is a story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times—the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant.

Flickr: USFWS

Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. We’ve lost 50% of the world’s coral in the last 30 years. Scientists say that climate change is now their greatest threat and it is estimated that only 10% can survive past 2050. In a new documentary film, “Chasing Coral,” a team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why coral are vanishing and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.

Amazon

Before men ruled the earth, there were wolves.

Once abundant in North America, these majestic creatures were hunted to near extinction in the lower 48 states by the 1920s. But in recent decades, conservationists have brought wolves back to the Rockies, igniting a battle over the very soul of the West.

tuesdayagency.com

StoryCorps founder David Isay joins Tom Williams for Monday's Access Utah. David Isay is editor of several books from StoryCorps including “Listening Is an Act of Love.” He’ll talk about the power of listening and the importance of each life story. StoryCorps’ mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives.

Amazon

The story of history is a ceaseless conversation between past and present  In his new book “American Dialogue: The Founders and Us” Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis focuses on the often-asked question “What would the Founding Fathers think?” He examines four of our most seminal historical figures through the prism of particular topics using the perspective of the present to shed light on their vie

KSL TV

The midterm elections are (mostly) in the books. The Democrats took control of the U.S. House of Representatives and made some inroads in governorships and state legislatures. The Republicans expanded their majority in the U.S. Senate. In Utah, Mitt Romney became Senator-elect, the race for the 4th Congressional District is too close to call. Several of the Propositions on the ballot appear headed for passage. And turnout was extremely high. We recap the elections and look ahead with Damon Cann, USU Professor of Political Science.

wkyt.com

Record numbers of women are running for office and engaged in the political process this year. We’ll ask why? And is this temporary or a lasting trend? What will all this mean this year and going forward? As a part of the UPR Original Series, Utah Women 20/20, we’ll discuss these issues on Wednesday’s Access Utah.

U of U Press

In his new book “Back Cast: Fly Fishing and Other Such Matters” Jeff Metcalf writes: “These waters have been my home, and I fish them more than most. In truth, they have saved my life on more than a few occasions. I seek refuge in the quiet solitude of rivers, and in dark hours of my life—including this particular year—I need desperately to be fly-fishing." Metcalf’s play “A Slight Discomfort,” is a humorous take on his battle with prostate cancer.

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