Tom Williams

The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from Colorado's headwaters, to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. HE takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and rv parks, to the spot near the U.S.-Mexico border where the river runs dry.

The Handmaid's Tale: Wednesday's Access Utah

May 24, 2017

 

 

There are over 30 million birders in this country alone, according to the Cornell Institute of Ornithology.  Why are so many people interested in birds and birdsong?

"Birds might reveal the secrets of Communication" writes Sylvia Torti in her new novel "Cages." 

Behind the Headlines: Chaffetz, Comey, Huntsman

May 19, 2017

Congressman Jason Chaffetz invites former FBI Director James Comey to testify publicly over a memo regarding a special request from Pres. Donald Trump. Jon Huntsman Jr. awaits nomination as ambassador to Russia more than two months after accepting the job. And with Chaffetz's plans to step down from Congress in June, Gov. Gary Herbert and the Utah Legislature still disagree on the process of filling the vacancy.

The words “Nixonian” and “Watergate territory” are being used increasingly in connection with the Trump Administration.

Next time on Access Utah we’ll examine those comparisons with John A. Farrell, author of the new book, “Richard Nixon: The Life.”

Las Vegas-based writer Laura McBride, is out with a new novel. “‘Round Midnight” spans the six decades when Las Vegas grew from a dusty gambling town into the melting pot metropolis it is today. It is the story of four women-- one who falls in love, one who gets lucky, one whose heart is broken, and one who has always wondered--whose lives change at the Midnight Room.

Laura McBride, author previously of “We Are Called to Rise,” is a graduate of Yale. She teaches at the College of Southern Nevada and lives in Las Vegas with her family.

As of last year, suicide was the leading cause of death among 10- to 17-year-olds in Utah and the youth suicide rate had tripled since 2007. Teen suicide is a hot topic lately with the advent of the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why.” Several groups, including The Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide, have expressed concerns that the media tends to glamorize and sensationalize suicide. We’ll talk about it next time on Access Utah, when our guests will include a representative from the Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide.

David Sandum appeared to have it all: a beautiful young family and a promising career ahead as a business consultant. But his life started veering off course, and upon returning to his native Scandinavia, he fell into an inexplicable, deep depression.

I'll Run Till the Sun Goes Down is an account of Sandum's struggle to overcome his crippling mental illness. After years of hopeless despair, bleak hospitalizations, and shattered dreams, he is finally saved by his art. The paintbrush becomes his lifeline. 

tesla.com

  USU Marketing Professor Edwin Stafford and his family have been early adopters of various forms of green technology. They have solar panels and a ground sourced energy system, for example. The next step, they decided, was the purchase of a Tesla electric vehicle as the new family car. Professor Stafford recounts some of their experiences in his article “Bridging the Chasm: An Early Adopter’s Perspectives on how Electric Vehicles Can Go Mainstream,” to be published in June in Sustainability: The Journal of Record.   

 

 

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S.—43.8 million, or 18.5%—experiences mental illness in a given year.1 Approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S.—9.8 million, or 4.0%—experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.2 Approximately 1 in 5 youth aged 13–18 (21.4%) experiences a severe mental disorder at some point during their life. For children aged 8–15, the estimate is 13%.3

W. W. Norton & Company

In an era when humans spend much of their time indoors staring at the dim glow of a screen, many of us have forgotten the simple pleasure of a stroll through a wooded glen, a hike up a secluded mountain path, or a nap in the grass. Many of us have a dog or go to the beach occasionally. But is that enough? In “The Nature Fix,” prize-winning science journalist Florence Williams asks, "What if?" What if something serious is missing from our lives? What if an occasional trip to the neighborhood park isn't enough?

tedx.usu.edu/

 Initially inspired by his own struggles with conflict, consultant and USU lecturer Clair Canfield is committed to changing the way people think and feel about conflict. He says, “Conflict holds up a mirror to our deepest needs and most cherished hopes and it is the doorway of opportunity for creating the change we want in our lives,” and “It is common to feel trapped and stuck when we experience conflict, but there is a way out!” His recent TEDxUSU talk is titled “The Beauty of Conflict.”

 

 The publishers of Emma Marris’ book “Rambunctious Garden” say that “a paradigm shift is roiling the environmental world. For decades people have unquestioningly accepted the idea that our goal is to preserve nature in its pristine, pre-human state. But many scientists have come to see this as an outdated dream that thwarts bold new plans to save the environment and prevents us from having a fuller relationship with nature. Humans have changed the landscapes they inhabit since prehistory, and climate change means even the remotest places now bear the fingerprints of humanity.

“Oceans are a sonic symphony. Sound is essential to the survival and prosperity of marine life. But man-made ocean noise is threatening this fragile world.” So say the producers of a documentary film, “Sonic Sea,” which takes us beneath the ocean’s surface to uncover the consequences of increased ocean noise pollution, including the mass stranding of whales around the planet, and looks at what can be done to stop it.

The acclaimed author of “Refuge” and “When Women Were Birds” and many others is one of the most thought provoking and articulate people you’ll meet and an hour with her is unfailingly interesting.

Today we’ll revisit a conversation with Wyoming-based writer Craig Johnson. Craig Johnson is the New York Times bestselling author of the Walt Longmire mystery novels, which are the basis for Longmire, the Netflix original drama. Craig Johnson has received many awards for his books. He lives in Ucross, Wyoming, population twenty-five.

 

Oxford University Press

Homesickness today is dismissed as a sign of immaturity: It's what children feel at summer camp. But in the nineteenth century it was recognized as a powerful emotion. When gold miners in California heard the tune "Home, Sweet Home," they sobbed. When Civil War soldiers became homesick, army doctors sent them home, lest they die. Such images don't fit with our national mythology, which celebrates the restless individualism of immigrants who supposedly left home and never looked back. 

Susan Matt, author of "Homesickness: An American History" says that iconic symbols of the undaunted, forward-looking American spirit were often homesick, hesitant, and reluctant voyagers. Even today, in a global society that prizes movement and that condemns homesickness as a childish emotion, colleges counsel young adults and their families on how to manage the transition away from home, suburbanites pine for their old neighborhoods, and companies take seriously the emotional toll borne by relocated executives and road warriors. By highlighting how Americans have reacted to moving farther and farther from their roots, Matt revises long-held assumptions about home, mobility, and our national identity.

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