UnDisciplined

Genetic Literacy Project

This week on UnDisciplined, we're joined by a scientist who helped create a transgenic mouse that can help us understand the human relationship with a vital molecule. We'll also chat with a researcher who just announced the discovery of nearly 50 new species right here in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. 

NASA

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking to a researcher whose work is going to change the way you think about the red planet. Then, we're going to talk to a scientist who is changing the way we think about how to diagnose and treat neurodegenerative diseases. 

Shannon Tushingham / Washington State University

This week on UnDisciplined, we talked to a researcher whose discoveries have changed the way we understand the history of tobacco in North America. Then we chatted with a scientist who is trying to change the way we think about cryptocurrencies. 

Utah Wildfires
upr.org

This week on UnDisciplined, we unpack two studies that are changing conventional wisdom. 

Our first guest is Ella Bean, who is changing the way people think about neanderthals.

Our second guest, Brendan Murphy, wants to reconsider the way we think about wildfires. 

Chris Bunker / The Daily Universe

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about really small things, like cell cultures and their effect on research, and really big things, like our planet's climate and its effect on human movement. 

Laurie Sparham/Miramax Films/Reuters

What do Judi Dench and Samuel L. Jackson have to do with ending crime waves and curing blindness? We'll find out this week when we're joined by guests Elizabeth Vargis and Sherry Towers. 

Alan Levine / Flickr

Each week on UnDisciplined, we bring two researchers together to talk about their recent work. 

This week, we're joined first by Karen Lloyd, whose research suggests microbial dark matter may be all around us. Then, we talked to Jacob Freeman, who uses trash to study the synchronous rise and fall of societies. 

Utah State University

Paul Rogers is racing to save a one-tree forest. Lisa Berreau is trying to prove that carbon monoxide can be good for us. Like we do every week, we'll try to draw connections between these two very different areas of work. 

Peter Forest / Getty Images (via NPR)

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about how evolving research impacts health recommendations. 

First, we're joined by Sarah Hartz, who believes that what you've been told about alcohol consumption is probably wrong. 

Then, we'll talk to Theo Ross, whose work shows that the health advice that comes from personal genetic testing often turns out to be wrong, too. 

Institute of Zoology

This week on UnDiscipined, we're talking about extending life — how nature does it and how humans might do it. Grace DiRenzo investigates the way animals evolve to beat deadly natural chemicals. Laura Niedernhofer studies natural chemicals that might help us prevent aging and put off death. Together, we'll talk about Fisetin, frogs, fungus, zombies and immortality. 

Kevork Djansezian / Getty

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the way people and animals move from place to place. Rick Geddes studies economic solutions for reducing traffic. Lori Spears is an entomologist who helps develop ways to keep non-native insects out of North America. 

Kevin Frayer / Getty Images

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the way newspapers impact the way people think, and the ways pollution impacts solar energy.

If those things sound like they have nothing in common — well, that's the idea.

Joining us are Alex Coppock, who studies how op-eds impact reader opinions, and Ian Marius Peters, who studies the impact of haze on energy production.

Joseph S Wilson / Utah State University

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about measuring wildlife — but at two very different scales.

Emily Sadler uses microscopes to measure insect stingers.

David Stoner uses satellites to measure populations of mountain lions, plants and mule deer.

How will they measure up to one another? We'll find out. 

University of Utah

Clement Chow studies how—and why—two people can get the same disease and have very different outcomes. Josh Tewksbury's research team has developed a model indicating how human-caused climate change stands to make insects much hungrier. Together, we'll try and build some bridges between those two very different areas of research.

Utah State University - Michel Kohl

Shefali Patil's recent studies have offered surprising insights into the way law enforcement officers see their jobs. Dan MacNulty's work seeks to understand the way animals interact in Yellowstone National Park. Together, we'll talk about police and predators. 

PBS

Erik Peper's recent studies have investigated the ways posture can affect performance. Brady Mattsson's recent work examines how natural resource officials can best share their expertise and experiences in managing protected areas. Together, we'll talk about the ways we manage our bodies, our minds and our environments.

Bipolar Network News

Ana Clara Bobadilla is a behavioral neuroscientist who discovered how a molecule may be able to help public health workers help people experiencing cocaine addiction. Rachael Kaspar is an evolutionary biologist who studies how bees work together to cool their hives. Together, we'll talk about bees and rats, and what we can learn about ourselves from both.

The Ohio State University

Gabriele Ciciurkaite studies the impact of food insecurity on mental health. Melissa Wrzesien investigates new ways to measure snowpacks. Together, we talk about how decision-making impacts resource allocation.

National Geographic

Ellada Gamreklidze examines the ways in which the views of members of the Supreme Court move through time.

Blaine Giriffen studies how polar bears move through water.

Together, we’ll discuss the ways in which old data can offer new clues about our world.

Trolls (2016)

Amanda Subalusky studies how ecosystems are impacted by migrating wildebeests in Africa. Candi Carter Olson's research focuses on how communities of interest use the media to get their messages heard. Together, we talk about gnus and the news.

On The Streets Of New York

James Cutting studies the way moviemakers exploit human emotions to tell stories. Zach Gompert examines fundamental questions about evolutionary genetics. Together, we talk about how things change over time and whether we can predict those changes.

ScienceNews.Org

Marlena Fejzo's research has suggested a genetic cause for morning sickness. Jared Martin's recent work demonstrates that not all smiles are created equal. In this episode, we talk about what's happening deep inside of us when we feel feelings.

SpaceX

Anna Cohen uses pulsed lasers to map ancient cities. David Geller works to identify space junk to prevent catastrophic orbital collisions. Together, we talk about how to best encourage young people to become scientific explorers. 

Utah State University

 

Yesola Kweon's recent work evaluates the ways in which government salary raises impact corruption. Bruce Bugbee has been researching ways to grow plants in space for more than 30 years. Together, we discuss the importance of "rethinking" in research. 

Karen Beard's most recent study showed a fascinating association between non-native species in Hawaii. Veronica Pozo's recent work demonstrates a frightening connection between social media and police violence. In this episode we discuss how to avoid looking for simple answers to complex problems.

Matthew LaPlante, host of Undisciplined, the new science show produced at Utah Public Radio, says “the scientific world is supposed to be a place where ideas come together. Instead, it’s often a place full of really brilliant people who don’t talk to each other.” 

Undisciplined is designed to break down those barriers.

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