Women's Issues

usu.edu

  Utah State University is joining the nation and state in celebrating significant voting rights anniversaries in 2020: the 150th anniversary of suffrage for Utah women; the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States; and the 55th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act. As the university honors these important milestones in our history, and as part of those celebrations, Utah State University also declares this the Year of the Woman.

PXHere

The group Utah Women & Leadership Project, based out of Utah Valley University, publishes studies on how Utah women and girls are doing in academics, politics and workplaces. Recently they did a follow up on a 2013 study called Utah Women in STEM on how Utah women are doing in STEM fields, namely how many are graduating with certificates in those areas and how many express interests in them. 

angelicacarpenter.com

Here is the opening passage from Angelica Shirley Carpenter’s book “Born Criminal: Matilda Joslyn Gage, Radical Suffragist:”

“In 1893, a deputy sheriff knocked on Matilda Joslyn Gage’s door in Fayetteville, New York. He had come to arrest her. ‘All of the crimes which I was not guilty of rushed through my mind,’ she wrote later, ‘but I failed to remember that I was a born criminal—a woman.’ Her crime: registering to vote. The verdict: guilty as charged.

Amazon

Walter Link and Miriam Wollaeger, a young geologist couple in 1920s Wisconsin, set out to find oil to supply the surging U.S. demand. This exciting work will allow them to build their lives in South and Central America, Indonesia, and Cuba. But from the first posting in Columbia, they quickly discover that no women are working in the field in these places. While Walter faces the hardships and thrills of exploration in the jungles and mountains, and eventually becomes chief geologist for Standard Oil, Miriam is left behind in the colonial capitals during Walter’s often lengthy times away.

angelicacarpenter.com

Here is the opening passage from Angelica Shirley Carpenter’s book “Born Criminal: Matilda Joslyn Gage, Radical Suffragist:”

“In 1893, a deputy sheriff knocked on Matilda Joslyn Gage’s door in Fayetteville, New York. He had come to arrest her. ‘All of the crimes which I was not guilty of rushed through my mind,’ she wrote later, ‘but I failed to remember that I was a born criminal—a woman.’ Her crime: registering to vote. The verdict: guilty as charged.

Women's March

Here’s what organizers of the national Women’s March are saying: “The 2017 Women’s March inspired hundreds of women to run, millions more to vote, and dozens to win elected office. The 2019 Women’s March marks two years of resistance to the Trump presidency, two years of training new activists, and two years of building power. And this time, we're coming back with an agenda. … The #WomensWave is coming.”

 

UPR

Utah Valley University professor Susan Madsen has been focusing for several years now on helping more women graduate from college and helping more girls and women in Utah become leaders in their organizations and communities. She is the founder and director of the Utah Women & Leadership Project at UVU.  

Walter Link and Miriam Wollaeger, a young geologist couple in 1920s Wisconsin, set out to find oil to supply the surging U.S. demand. This exciting work will allow them to build their lives in South and Central America, Indonesia, and Cuba. But from the first posting in Columbia, they quickly discover that no women are working in the field in these places. While Walter faces the hardships and thrills of exploration in the jungles and mountains, and eventually becomes chief geologist for Standard Oil, Miriam is left behind in the colonial capitals during Walter’s often lengthy times away.

wkyt.com

Record numbers of women are running for office and engaged in the political process this year. We’ll ask why? And is this temporary or a lasting trend? What will all this mean this year and going forward? As a part of the UPR Original Series, Utah Women 20/20, we’ll discuss these issues on Wednesday’s Access Utah.

Twitter: @jmgossard

Julia Gossard, assistant professor of history at Utah State University, says that since thousands of witch trials took place across Europe and North America, one stereotypical image of an early modern woman is that of a witch. Gossard teaches a class called “Witches, Workers, & Wives,” which examines attitudes, ideas, and stereotypes about gender, sexuality, and power - including how the witch became a quintessential early modern trope. Julia Gossard is giving a presentation on Halloween for the USU Center for Women and Gender.

The Handmaid's Tale: Wednesday's Access Utah

May 24, 2017

 

Pexels

As director of the Utah State University Center for Women and Gender, Ann Austin is responsible for finding and scheduling guest speakers who can address issues effecting women throughout the world. During a recent lecture by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, students and community members in Cache Valley were told that worldwide, violence toward women is a modern-day moral matter.

Lorie Shaull / Wikimedia Commons

  

More than 200,000 people plan to march at the U.S. Capitol on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump.

Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of people rallied at Utah’s state capitol over the weekend to show their support for President Barack Obama’s signature health care law. The rally was one of several around the country.

Punk Musician Inspires Women

Jun 14, 2016
Photo: Mikey Kettinger

In April Utah Public Radio reporters spent two days training with national Peabody Award-winning producers The Kitchen Sisters. The workshop has resulted in a series of storytelling projects, including this one from arts and entertainment reporter, Mikey Kettinger, who spoke with musician Kathy Foster. Foster is a female bass player for the Thermals. The American indie band, based in Portland performed this past spring in Salt Lake City.

At a high school, four people stand in front of a table, surrounded by posters.
Kari Schott

As the students from the Jordan High School Young Democrats set up their table in the middle of the common area, there was an air of nervous anticipation. This was their first big event as a club and it had already garnered enough attention to attract TV cameras to the scene.

They were holding what's being called a “gender equality bake sale” with the goal to highlight the issue of wage inequality between men and women. The cookies, artfully arranged on the table, were sold at 77 cents apiece for girls, and $1 for boys.

Their president and founder, Kari Schott, said the price of the cookies reflects the current relative earning power of the genders due to pay inequality.

“We mostly got good comments from it, but some people were a little outraged by it. They thought that we were being sexist, which we were, but that’s the point - to maybe start a conversation and make change," Schott said.


As some companies add egg freezing to their list of fertility benefits, they're touting the coverage as a family-friendly perk.

Women's health advocates say they welcome any expansion of fertility coverage. But they say that the much-publicized changes at a few high-profile companies such as Facebook and Apple are still relatively rare, even for women with serious illnesses like cancer who want to preserve their fertility.

The pay gap between men and women has been narrowing for decades. But it persists, and it gets larger as women move toward the middle of their careers.

In a recent paper, Harvard economist Claudia Goldin looked at the gap in a bunch of different ways — how it's changed over time, how it changes over the course of people's careers, and how it varies from industry to industry.

Women In Utah Are Stronger Than Study Inferred

Nov 3, 2014
National Endowment for the Humanities

An October study by 24/7wallst.com shows Utah is the worst state for women to live in and cited lack of leadership roles in government and unequal pay as part of their findings.

Michael Lyons, associate professor in the political science department at Utah State University said Utah’s conservative culture that promotes traditional gender roles means many women in the state don’t choose leadership positions. He said change is a matter of time.

“You’re never going to convert a population to a different set of political values in a short time-frame," Lyons said. "Instead, what you see is generational replacement, altering cultures and political attitudes.”

Jeannie Johnson, an assistant professor in the political science department at USU, and a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said women in Utah are not without a voice, though their choices might infer otherwise.