Laurel Wamsley

Sen. Tammy Duckworth has just blazed one more trail: She's the first U.S. Senator to give birth while in office.

With the arrival of a baby girl named Maile, Duckworth becomes one of just 10 women to give birth while serving in Congress. Duckworth, 50, had her first child in 2014, while she was a member of the House of Representatives. The senator lost both of her legs in the Iraq War.

The Denver Post isn't the only newspaper to be bought by a hedge fund that then orders layoffs, shrinking the newsroom to a shell of its former self within a few years.

But it wrote a new page of its history when it fought back in its Sunday edition, with an editorial and a package of opinion pieces around one central idea: Its owners are bleeding the Post, and Coloradans are going to miss it if it dies.

Updated at 1:08 p.m. ET Saturday

At least 16 Palestinians have been killed and more than 1,000 injured in clashes Friday with Israeli troops along the Gaza border, according to the United Nations.

The victims range in age from 16 to 42 years old, according to Palestinian health officials. Palestinian health officials tell NPR that hundreds of Palestinians suffered from a range of injuries. The Associated Press reports the injuries were from live fire, rubber bullets or tear gas.

As part of the settlement after it got caught cheating on its emissions tests, Volkswagen has bought back about 350,000 of its U.S. diesel vehicles. The automaker so far has spent more than $7.4 billion on the cars, according to court filings seen by Reuters.

Fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin tells NPR's Morning Edition that political forces in the Trump administration want to privatize the VA — and that he was standing in the way.

"There are many political appointees in the VA that believe that we are moving in the wrong direction or weren't moving fast enough toward privatizing the VA," he said. "I think that it's essential for national security and for the country that we honor our commitment by having a strong VA. I was not against reforming VA, but I was against privatization."

An Ohio fertility clinic said that the remote alarm system on its storage tank was turned off, so it didn't know that the temperature had fluctuated, and that the consequences were worse than it initially thought — all 4,000 eggs and embryos in the cryofreezer are likely nonviable.

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

Authorities arrested a man in Washington state on Tuesday in connection with a number of suspicious packages that arrived Monday at federal facilities in and around Washington, D.C.

Thanh Cong Phan, 43, was arrested at his home in Everett, Wash., the FBI said. He was taken into custody by FBI agents from the Seattle field office and Snohomish County sheriff's deputies around 12 hours after the first package was discovered.

Skiers in Russia posted some bizarre photos on social media over the weekend: slopes covered in snow with an unmistakably orange tinge.

Meanwhile in Crete, the sky had a similar mandarin glow, as if scooped from the same pint of sherbet.

It turns out these two phenomena have the same cause: strong winds in North Africa that are stirring sand from the Sahara and blowing it northeast across the Mediterranean.

Updated 9:05 p.m. ET

President Trump ordered the expulsion of 60 Russian officials from the United States and ordered the closure of the Russian consulate in Seattle, the White House announced Monday.

The move follows the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the English city of Salisbury on March 4.

Updated Saturday at 12:50 p.m. ET

A French police officer who was severely wounded on Friday after exchanging himself for a gunman's hostage has died of his injuries, raising the death toll in the attack to four, according to French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb.

Col. Arnaud Beltrame, 44, was one of the first police officers to respond to the attack on a supermarket in southern France, which began after a gunman killed one victim in a carjacking, then killed two others in the grocery store. Sixteen others were also wounded in the attack.

The city council in Los Alamitos, Calif., voted on Monday night to exempt itself from the state's so-called sanctuary law, which limits cooperation between local enforcement and federal immigration agents authorities.

And in the process, the Orange County city of fewer than 12,000 is aligning itself with a harder line on immigration than the more liberal policies adopted elsewhere in California.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Authorities say a fourth device that exploded in Austin, Texas, this month indicates a "serial bomber" — and one who is more sophisticated than the earlier bombs suggested.

Updated at 10:05 p.m. ET

Florida transportation officials say that an engineer with the private firm that designed the concrete bridge that collapsed Thursday called the state two days before the incident to report cracks in the structure.

It's not immediately known whether the reported cracks contributed to the collapse of the pedestrian walkway that was intended to join the campus of Florida International University and the city of Sweetwater.

In the latest battle involving the works of Harper Lee, the author's estate is suing producer Scott Rudin over the script of an upcoming Broadway play of To Kill A Mockingbird.

In a lawsuit filed in federal court in Alabama, Lee's estate complains that the new production by Rudin and writer Aaron Sorkin deviates too much from the novel.

The U.S. Justice Department has charged three Central Illinois men with the bombing of a Minnesota mosque in August.

Michael Hari, 47, Michael McWhorter, 29, and Joe Morris, 22, were charged with using an explosive device to damage the Dar al-Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington, near Minneapolis. No one was hurt in the bombing, which exploded in the imam's office.

Two reports to the United Nations have found that Myanmar has carried out extreme human rights violations against the Rohingya people, abuses that are most likely crimes under international law.

The U.N. Human Rights Council heard both reports on Monday: one from the Independent Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar, and another from Yanghee Lee, the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Myanmar.

The state attorney in Broward County, Fla., announced Tuesday that he intends to seek the death penalty in the Parkland school shooting case.

In a news release, Broward County State Attorney Michael Satz said he had filed the notice of intent to seek death in the case against 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz.

Cruz has been charged with 17 counts of murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last month.

Famed French fashion designer Hubert de Givenchy has died at age 91, the couture house bearing his name confirms.

Known for designing the little black dress that Audrey Hepburn wears in the opening scene of 1961's Breakfast At Tiffany's, Givenchy was a trailblazer in the world of ready-to-wear fashion.

Born into an aristocratic family in the northern French town of Beauvais, Givenchy was a physically towering man who launched his first collection to immediate fanfare, as Reuters reports:

Most of us will lose an hour of sleep this weekend as we dutifully spring forward and daylight saving time begins.

But if Florida gets its way, the state will stay on daylight saving time ... forever.

On Tuesday, Florida's Senate approved the Sunshine Protection Act, which asks Congress to allow the state to observe daylight saving time year-round — not just the eight months that is standard in the United States.

The FBI paid Best Buy Geek Squad employees as informants, rewarding them for flagging indecent material when people brought their computers in for repair.

That's according to documents released to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a digital civil liberties organization, which filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit seeking records that might show warrantless searches of people's devices.

Since Gerald Ford, every president has released their tax returns. Except for our current president, that is.

Maryland is the latest state attempting to make the release of tax returns not simply a gesture of transparency by a presidential candidate, but a requirement to run for the job.

What qualifies as a dumpster fire depends on who's watching, but you tend know it when you see it.

But if forced to define it for someone not prone to hashtagging, you might quote Merriam-Webster:

Dumpster fire (noun, US informal): "an utterly calamitous or mismanaged situation or occurrence: disaster."

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