Project Resilience: Becoming Resilient By Overcoming Resistance

The award-winning UPR production team and Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities presents Project Resilience, a yearlong storytelling project created for any of us hoping to find ways to bounce back, recover, and develop our mental abilities. The stories found in the series hope to encourage social and personal resilience by introducing listeners to neighbors and friends who have experienced assault, personal loss, bullying, mental health challenges and other tragedies.

We're working with local, state and national organizations to make public radio programs, distribute a podcast, provide tools for living, and create a resilience resource database. 

  • Ideas for becoming more resilient can be found here. 
  • Resilient parenting tips can be found here.
  • The "Mental Health Crossroads" podcast, produced by MHDD, can be listned to on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Podbean.
  • List of community connections will be available shortly. 
            Check back often for updates. 

Do you or your organization have a resiliency story you would like to share or a resource to add to our growing list? Call the UPR Project Resilience phone line to share your story or tip at (435) 797-9679 or email us at upr@usu.edu.

Be sure to:

  • Leave your name and contact information
  • Share a brief description of your story or tip. 

The Project Resilience series premieres January 2020. 

Project Resilience is made possible in part by our members, the Utah State University Center for Persons With Disabilities, and The Family Place.

Mary Heers

In this Project Resilience vignette, UPR producer Mary Heers tells us how card playing has helped her meet new people and make connections over the years.

Courtesy of Janelle and Colton Carter

 


As part of UPR’s Project Resilience series, producer Mary Heers introduces us to a young husband and wife who are familiar with the challenges of adapting when life takes a sudden turn. 

Mary: Janelle Carter wanted to become a German teacher ever since she took her first German class in the seventh grade and was right on track. It was only supposed to be a short trip to Montana to visit her husband's family. Colton went out four wheeling with his friends. Janelle stayed home because she was four months pregnant. Then everything changed. Colton lost control of his four wheeler and hit a tree so hard it broke his back and severed his spinal cord.

Dani Hayes

Many longtime UPR listeners may remember Utah Public Radio reporter Rhesa Ledbetter. Rhesa has a PhD in biochemistry from Utah State University, is a science professor at Idaho State University, and is an award-winning storyteller. 

Women do the lion’s share of unpaid care work in Utah, spending an average of 5.6 hours a day looking after children or parents. Utah’s women in their 40s and 50s often spend time doing both child and elder care. It makes for some stressful moments in the best of times, and the pandemic adds some new challenges.

Matilyn Mortensen

“All of the things together, like being pregnant in a foreign country while mourning the loss of my brother, felt like the hardest thing I've ever done. And I've done hard things before as we all have. But for me, these were the hardest together and the timing of them and I felt so alone.”

USU Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology

Derrik Tollefson is Professor of Social Work and head of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology at Utah State University. He also directs the I-System Institute for Transdisciplinary Studies at USU.

Tamsen Maloy

A study from the Urban Indian Health Institute found that Utah ranks 8th in the nation for the number of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

Pexels

Our new learn-from-home courses are free, fun and available to you and your family. Classes are led by Southern Utah experts volunteering their time and talents in interactive 45-minute sessions. Learn techniques for green thumb gardening, interior decorating, making Italian cuisine and even take a virtual hike with a southern Utah geologist. 

Chao Yen,https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

As things are beginning to reopen, we want to invite visitors to experience the wonders of Utah's Canyon Country with the San Juan Strong promise to do their part to keep us and our communities healthy. 

Molly Marcello, KZMU

At the gateway to both Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, it’s been unusually quiet this spring. Moab shut the door to visitors for six long weeks during what is usually the busiest time of year. The town is still not fully open, and many locals are dealing with continued unemployment and financial insecurity. All around tensions are high.  

 

Shalayne Smith Needham: We have all dealt with the effects of COVID-19 in one way or another and some of us will come out of this a new person. Joining us to discuss this is Dr. David Schram, an associate professor of human development and family studies in the College of Education at Utah State University. 

 

pixabay.com

There are many tourism opportunities right in your own backyard. They are a great way to cope during COVID-19 and a great way to become more resilient.

Project Resilience: Culturally Responsive Therapy

May 21, 2020

 

It’s no secret Utah is a majority white state. That majority holds true for mental health workers as well, and it’s part of what makes culturally responsive therapy important. 

MENTAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES NATIONAL TRAINING CENTER

 

Ah, that first year of college. It’s like this tidal wave of freedom. And pressure.

Courtesy of Barbara Abbott.

As part of the Utah Public Radio series, Project Resilience, we hear from retired Northern Utah teacher Barbara Abbott, who remembers times she would take her wayward dog Cedar Bear to work with students at Hillcrest Elementary.

Pikist

 

Shalayne Smith Needham: In stressful times, it's important to reach out to friends, family, and especially children who need guidance during these hard times. Callie Ward is an Extension assistant professor at Utah State University and specializes in family finance, family resource management, emergency preparedness and food preservation. Callie Ward joins us by phone from Garfield County. Thanks for being here. 

Michael Sowder

A while back on Access Utah, Michael Sowder, USU professor of English and affiliated professor of religious studies, helped us learn some of the history and current practice of yoga. On Tuesday’s Access Utah he’ll lead us in an exploration of mindfulness and meditation, which may be of special interest during these times of pandemic.

https://www.pxfuel.com/en/free-photo-xpknz

 

Being stuck at home all day has led many people to feel they should get more done-- get their side hustle going, learn to play the piano, get in shape. Social media may fuel or heighten this pressure as people see others post their goals online as part of a trend that is sometimes called "quarantine glow-up."

Cait Salinas | UPR

From social distancing to new levels of anxiety and distress, the coronavirus pandemic has rapidly transformed our lives. On Sunday morning at 10:00, tune in to UPR to hear an interfaith program featuring messages of hope tailored to this particular moment.

Petr Kratochvil

 

Social distancing means the Cache Employment and Training Center has to be creative in the ways they serve their clients.  

Tamsen Maloy

 

 

According to a 2018 study from the Urban Indian Health Institute, Utah ranks 8th in the nation for the   

number of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. Utah legislators recently formed a task force to address why Utah’s numbers are so high. But the bill is only a part of the overall work being done to address this issue. 

UPR will broadcast a special epsiode of The Pulse from WNYY on how to be resilient during the pandemic. The edpisode will be played on UPR at 10 a.m. on Friday and at 3 p.m. on Saturday. After it airs, it can be found online here

 


Social distancing guidelines mean the services Utah drug courts provide have been drastically cut back and altered. Earlier this week, we looked at how staff at the Bear River Health Department are adapting to meet safety guidelines. Now, we share with you the experience of one drug court participant. 

While social distancing and event cancellations make it harder for organizations to connect the public to humanities projects, Deena Pyle at Utah Humanities created a Virtual Campfire campaign to increase public involvement, connection and conversations.
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Deena Pyle, the communication director for the non-profit Utah Humanities, said she’s impressed and inspired by the ways people are fighting to stay connected despite all of the social distancing initiatives enacted in the state to slow the spread of the coronavirus. So inspired, she created the organization’s Virtual Campfire social media and email campaign to encourage conversations about the impact of the humanities in our lives.

 

Utah drug courts play an important role in addressing the state’s opioid epidemic, especially in rural communities. Now that efforts to mitigate the coronavirus pandemic are limiting face-to-face interactions many of these services are being moved to virtual platforms. 

Courtesy of Jackie Worthen


As concerns about shortages of personal protective equipment and hospital overcrowding during the coronavirus pandemic grew, Utah’s governor issued an executive order last month stopping all elective surgeries in the state. For one Cedar City family, this means their five-month-old baby is awaiting a postponed cleft lip and palate surgery.

 

“Vernal strong” is the motto right now in one Unitah Basin community as residents work together to help each other through not only the global pandemic, but also the downturn in the oil and gas  industry which has hit the community hard. 

Courtesy of Nielsen Family

 


Being a new parent can be exhausting. 

 

Jordan: “You’d be falling asleep and you’re so tired and then you have some kind of thought of, ‘Oh, he’s in the bed with us,’ and  you forgot that you put him in his crib, so he’s in the crib, but then you’re all stressed looking through the bed trying to find him.” 

 

Stress, anxiety, domestic violence rates rise due to the coronavirus pandemic. Utah increasing free resources to cope with COVID-19, coronavirus-related mental health issues.
Rido / Adobe Stock

There’s an ever-growing number of free telephone and online resources for Utahns who are dealing with stress and anxiety brought on by the coronavirus pandemic and related job losses. Morissa Henn, the Community Health program director at Intermountain Healthcare, is part of the group that formed the Emotional Health Relief Hotline to help Utahns with mental-health needs as they arise. 

This isn’t breaking news, but every one of us is feeling some tension, a lot of uncertainty.

And if you are, so are your kids or, sometimes, grandkids, in the case of Vonda Jump Norman, an assistant professor of Social Work.

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