Deseret News

Utah sees a big spike in coronavirus cases, with a whopping 911 new cases on Thursday. How children transmit the virus and what we know about Utah's school outbreaks. What polling says about the 4th District congressional race. And Sen. Mike Lee tries to downplay the role of climate change in this year's devastating wildfires. 

Steven Depolo, creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The Los Angeles Unified School District funds the largest independent school police department in the nation. Last year, the department was funded to the tune of 70 million dollars. So, what does the district get for that investment? Well, according to a new report, a lot of distrust among students. Today we’ll dissect the research.  

At 911 confirmed cases of COVID-19, Utah saw it’s largest single-day increase in coronavirus numbers today. A new outbreak of the virus in Utah county among 15-24-year-olds was also reported to now be spreading among all age categories. 

Most of life’s intricacies can be explained by evolution — as organisms encounter new challenges, subsequent generations evolve a­nd become better equipped to survive.

Wikipedia

Once again during this Fall Member Drive, we’re doing the Best of Access Utah. Today our focus is on the arts and music.

Wild About Utah: Night Music

Sep 16, 2020
A red Katydid on a green and yellow plant
https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/7982/rec/1

It gives me great pleasure to take a moonlight walk on these warm summer nights, serenaded by a gazillion insect musicians. Pulsing in unison with a background of cricket chirps, it reminds me that summer is waning and I must enjoy what remains!

Utah Skies: Planets With Rings

Sep 16, 2020
By NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab

When we think of a ringed planet in our solar system, Saturn naturally comes to mind. Besides Saturn however, there are three other planets that have rings, namely Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune.

The Daily Utah Chronicle


It’s a member drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Ken Sanders from Ken Sanders Rare Books in Salt Lake City. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite recent episodes of the program.

Preparing Fruit Trees For The Cold Weather

Sep 15, 2020
Pixabay

At long last, the temperatures are beginning to cool in northern Utah. Some locations have already experienced black frosts. During September the last of the peaches and apples will be harvested. At the end of the season, it's time to begin preparing fruit trees for the cold weather that will surely come. The idea is to not do things that encourage growth. Here are some ideas to consider.

ag.ndsu.edu/

As September progresses, temperatures begin to cool, and the possibility of frosty weather increases. If your garden is like mine, there's a lot of produce left in it. So pay attention to the weather.

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The Latest From NPR

With President Trump soon to nominate a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, some Democrats are returning to an idea that hasn't been seriously proposed since the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt: increasing the number of justices on the Supreme Court.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

September is when newspapers and magazines would usually publish their fall theater previews. But this year, there's no fall season - at least not in any traditional sense. So what is theater going to look like when the pandemic is over? Reporter Jeff Lunden spoke with three people in a position to re-imagine the future of theater.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: Oskar Eustis, artistic director of New York's Public Theater, knows firsthand about the coronavirus.

Tributes and remembrances have poured in from across the country following the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday night.

Oskar Eustis, artistic director of The Public Theater in New York, knows firsthand about the coronavirus. Eustis was hospitalized with COVID on March 10, and by the time he was released five days later, everything was shut down. "I came out into a world that had no theater, and it's a different world," he says.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

September is when newspapers and magazines would usually publish their fall theater previews. But this year, there's no fall season - at least not in any traditional sense. So what is theater going to look like when the pandemic is over? Reporter Jeff Lunden spoke with three people in a position to re-imagine the future of theater.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: Oskar Eustis, artistic director of New York's Public Theater, knows firsthand about the coronavirus.

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