_ChrisUK / Flickr

USU Researchers Use CRISPR Technology To Change DNA In Silkworms

Utah State University’s Synthetic Spider Silk Laboratory is using CRISPR technology to edit the DNA of silkworms in order to increase the strength and elasticity of their silk. Their DNA will contain strands from silk spiders, who are known for their incredibly strong silk.

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USU Extension

According to the Centers for Disease Control, over 70,000 Americans died of an overdose in 2017, over 47,000 of which involved opioids.  The Utah Department of Health reported that Utah has been ranked in the top 10 states for overdose deaths for the last 10 years, and Carbon and Emery counties have opioid overdose mortality rates 2.5 times the national average.  In order to address these issues, a summit will be held this week at Utah State University Eastern in Price.

Courtney Bullard of the Utah Health Policy Project at a meeting in Logan on Tuesday.
Chris Polansky / Utah Public Radio

Healthcare advocates are touring the state of Utah this summer, meeting with citizens, healthcare providers and community leaders concerned that the state’s rollback of Medicaid expansion will harm vulnerable Utahns.

Hope And Healing: Life After An Amputation

21 hours ago
Intermountain Healthcare

Hiking in the Utah mountains, Casey Hunter slipped and fell down a steep snowy incline and boulder patch. With his leg hanging and patched together with a make-shift tourniquet, he crawled up the mountain, found the cell phone he had dropped in the fall, and called his wife, Amy. A Life Flight hoist team rescued him from the slope. 

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

The Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative was launched by Utah State University Extension in 2018 in an effort to provide effective resources to address opioid use among rural Utahns. The initiative team is working to combat the effects of opioid misuse through prevention, recovery and treatment, with a primary focus on stigma reduction education. Today on Access Utah we preview the summit.

Litter Problem Burgeoning At Utah's National Parks

Jul 17, 2019
David Stanley / Flickr

Utah’s national parks are having more visitors, but unfortunately, they are leaving more trash. 

Dani Hayes / Utah Public Radio

Colby Sorenson is 27, Charles Salzberg is 75.  Ordinarily they would not mix, but when they came into the UPR studio, they discovered their life experiences had led them to a very similar place.

Tourism - And Vandalism - Are On The Rise In Utah

Jul 16, 2019
Molly Marcello

It’s early morning at Sand Flats Recreation Area as a small group of people makes their way over sandstone and brush. Usually, visitors to Sand Flats bring their mountain bikes or off-road vehicles. They’re recreators in search of the internationally famous trails over slick rock. But this particular group of people - walking with notebooks and sturdy shoes - is searching out something else.

Lee O'Dell/Adobe Stock

Water quality in and around the Snake River in southern Idaho is on the decline, according to a new report. 

Amazon

George Bird Grinnell, the son of a New York merchant, saw a different future for a nation in the thrall of the Industrial Age. With railroads scarring virgin lands and the formerly vast buffalo herds decimated, the country faced a crossroads: Could it pursue Manifest Destiny without destroying its natural bounty and beauty? The alarm that Grinnell sounded would spark America’s conservation movement. Yet today his name has been forgotten—an omission that John Taliaferro’s commanding biography now sets right with historical care and narrative flair.

USDA Forest Service

Cache Valley and the Bear River Range that borders its eastern edge are anomalies - especially considering the abundance of water coursing through its canyons and valley bottom.

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Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Manhattan has ordered that multimillionaire Jeffrey Epstein remain confined while he awaits trial on federal sex trafficking charges.

U.S. District Judge Richard M. Berman announced his decision that the 66-year-old financier be held without bail on Thursday, following a hearing Monday in which Epstein's lawyer asked that his client be placed on house arrest.

The brother of the suicide bomber who killed nearly two dozen people after an Ariana Grande concert in 2017 appeared in a London court on Thursday to face charges that he helped carry out the attack in Manchester, England.

Hashem Abedi, who was extradited from Libya this week, said through his lawyer that he was not involved in the attack. The 22-year-old wore glasses and a gray shirt and spoke only to confirm his name, date of birth and British nationality, according to media reports.

Iran says that its Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy has seized a foreign-flagged oil tanker in the Persian Gulf, alleging that the ship was smuggling 1 million liters (264,000 gallons) of fuel. Iranian state news outlets report that the ship had a crew of 12 aboard.

The vessel was seized south of Larak Island in the Strait of Hormuz, according to the state-run IRNA news agency. The island sits less than 20 miles off the Iranian mainland, south of Bandar Abbas.

Miranda Lambert really knows how to announce a new single. For "It All Comes Out in the Wash" — a cute-as-hell country bop that reminds us that "hard times do eventually pass," as she put it in a press release — Lambert filmed her shirtless husband doing laundry. You know, as one does.

The Apollo program conjures images of Neil Armstrong's first steps on the moon and the massive team effort involved in getting him there. But a fundamental decision that led to the successful lunar landings came largely as a result of one man's determination to buck the system at NASA.

That man was John C. Houbolt.

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