Intermountain Healthcare

Hope And Healing: Search And Rescue Volunteers Saving Lives

Darrin Hawes and Keith Hambly are best friends and search and rescue volunteers in northern Utah. One Memorial Day, during a search and rescue mission, Darrin also helped save Keith’s life using CPR. When Keith’s heart started beating again, he underwent heart surgery and the placement of two stents that same day.

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Cache Theatre Company

In mid-April, the local Cache Theatre Company conspired to steal a bit of the thunder of the 2019 summer theater season with its production of the jukebox musical “Mama Mia.” The Lyric Repertory Company is slated to debut the same show in June, but CTC beat them to the punch.

news.rutgers.edu
Rutgers University

Drones have rapidly increased in popularity in the past few years, and according to a study from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, that includes state governments.

USU Office of Research

Over 70% of Americans—and two-thirds of Utahns—think that climate change is happening. Research led by Dr. Peter Howe reveals this statistic, along with much more detailed data about how Americans think about climate change from the national to the local level. Drawing from large surveys of the American public, Dr. Howe’s research has developed statistical methods to map public opinion, risk perceptions, and responses in every state, county, and even neighborhood across the country.

Ski Utah

Skiing in Utah has long been one of the largest economic drivers in the state, and thanks to large amounts of snowfall, this past winter has shattered records. Utah ski resorts saw a record 5.1 million skiers on the slopes and resorts reported the highest number of skier days ever, rising 12 percent from the previous record, set two years ago.

Conservationists Oppose Moving BLM HQ To Western State

May 21, 2019
HannahCowan/BLM

Federal officials say they plan to reveal later this year whether they will relocate the Bureau of Land Management headquarters to a Western state. The stated goal is to better manage federally owned public lands, which are mostly in the West. But conservation have questioned the Trump administration's motives. 

WSU Insider

Bill Lipe is professor emeritus of anthropology at Washington State University. He has spent much of his more than 50 year career in Utah archaeology beginning with the archaeological salvage of Glen Canyon before the dam construction and on into Cedar Mesa where he became a leading scholar in the early Basketmaker agricultural societies of southeastern Utah. Dr. Lipe began his work at a time when there was little federal legislation protecting archaeology or guiding preservation efforts.

Plans For The Uinta Basin Railroad Are Moving Forward

May 21, 2019
Ken Lund / Flickr

Plans for the long-anticipated Uinta Basin railroad are moving forward, and some are banking on the new transportation line to strengthen Utah's economy.

Wikimedia Commons

  

The State of Utah and the Bureau of Land Management recently revised plans to restore and manage populations of Greater Sage Grouse in the Intermountain West — and researchers say this time, they got it right.

USU History Department

Elizabethans lived through a time of cultural collapse and rejuvenation as the impacts of globalization, the religious Reformation, economic and scientific revolutions, wars, and religious dissent forced them to reformulate their ideas of God, nation, society and self. Being Elizabethan portrays how people’s lives were shaped and changed by the tension between a received belief in divine stability and new, destabilizing, ideas about physical and metaphysical truth. 

Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

If you live in one of Utah’s towns that are overrun with turkeys, you might be interested in a new Division of Wildlife Resources proposal that will add new release sites for captured turkeys –making the new sites far away from suburbs and farms.

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This one-hour special examines with fresh eyes Utah's history with the railroad on the 150th anniversary of the Golden Spike.

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The Latest From NPR

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

The Senate approved a 19.1 billion disaster aid package Thursday that includes money for states impacted by flooding, recent hurricanes and tornadoes, as well as money for communities rebuilding after wildfires.

The measure passed overwhelmingly — 85-8.

Ames, Iowa, has the lowest unemployment rate in the country. That's great for workers — but a challenge for those looking for them.

Tanisha Cortez is one of those benefiting from this tight labor market. The restaurant where Cortez worked closed in late November, so she went looking for a new job. She submitted applications to about half a dozen companies.

Almost right away, she got offers from every one of them. And she was working again at a new restaurant two weeks later. She will earn $2,000 more a year than she made at her old job.

In northeast Syria, an overcrowded detention camp is home to more than 73,000 people who lived in the former ISIS caliphate. Almost three-quarters of the al-Hol camp residents are children — born to Syrian, Iraqi and other foreign parents who flocked to the ISIS caliphate over the five years it ruled territory here.

In recent visits to the camp, NPR was told of babies dying from malnutrition and disease, and found women collapsed by the side of the road.

An incapacitated woman who gave birth after being a patient at an Arizona health care facility for more than two decades had been raped repeatedly and may have been impregnated before, her lawyers say.

In documents filed Wednesday, the 29-year-old woman's attorneys cite a medical exam in alleging she suffered multiple sexual assaults. The exam found the birth of a baby boy last December was "a non-nulliparous event," the documents say, meaning she may have been pregnant before.

One morning in 2011, Rémy Louvradoux went to his management job at the French telecommunications company where he had worked for 30 years. At 7 a.m., alone in the parking lot of his office near Bordeaux, in southwestern France, he killed himself.

His son, Raphael Louvradoux, told the news site L'Obs that his father wrote the company a letter two years before taking his life.

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