JoLynne Lyon

Young adults play games during a conference
Center for Persons with Disabilities

People and families who receive Medicaid-funded home and community-based service waivers can learn more about how a rule change will affect their services during a training event in Salt Lake City on Thursday. 

a mobile phone with the message: Hello
Photo by VanveenJF on Unsplash

In today’s booming economy, more and more employers are facing a shortage of workers; one that they might fill by reaching out to people with disabilities. But what about the cost of accommodations for workers with disabilities?

Diagnosed: Employing People With Disabilities

Jun 5, 2019
The Crepery storefront
JoLynne Lyon / Center for Persons with Disabilities

We’ve heard a lot about the booming economy, and it’s true the employment rate has risen, for both people with and without disabilities. 

Still, the employment gap—that’s the difference in employment rates between typical employees and those with disabilities—is still wider than it was in 2008, when the Great Recession began, according to a study from the University of New Hampshire.

Where does Utah fit in all of this? We rank third in the nation for employment rates among people with disabilities, according to the same study.  Today, as part of the UPR original series Diagnosed, JoLynne Lyon speaks to an employer and a service provider. They have different jobs, but they both want employees with disabilities to thrive—and the companies that hire them to succeed, too.

portrait
Photo courtesy of Aggies Elevated

High schools and universities around the state are gearing up for graduation. For some, leaving school means entering the adult world. But for people with disabilities, an independent life is less certain. Eight in 10 people with disabilities are not in the labor force, compared with three in 10 among people without a disability. 

3D image of George Washington crossing the Delaware.
3DPhotoWorks

Vision loss has affected at least 9,000 Utahns, and probably many more. For people who have recently lost their eyesight, it can feel like a tragedy. Everette Bacon, president of the National Federation of the Blind in Utah, has a very different view of blindness. It’s a vision he hopes to share with the blind, their families and their service providers during an upcoming convention in Salt Lake City.

Diagnosed: Why Can't You Do This At Home?

Nov 7, 2018

With advancements in Internet technology, it’s easy to think the difficulties people with disabilities have with getting from place to place can be solved by the Internet. After all, people can telecommute to work, have a virtual doctor’s visit and shop online.

A young woman smiles from her bed.
JoLynne Lyon / Center for Persons with Disabilities

Imagine a world where you cannot drive. Where trains don’t travel and busses don’t run. How might that impact your ability to access quality healthcare?

Diagnosed: A Small-town Success Story Of Employment

Oct 25, 2018

In 2017, the unemployment rate in the United States fell across the board. But fewer than 19 percent of people with disabilities were employed, compared with more than 65 percent of the general population, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Among people actively looking for work, the unemployment rate for people with disabilities is more than double that of the general population.

JoLynne Lyon / Center for Persons with Disabilities

“With stroke, we have a very short time window when we’re able to treat people,” said Dr. Marilyn McKasson , telestroke medical director for Intermountain Healthcare.

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JoLynne Lyon / Center for Persons with Disabilities

“I hit the wheelchair almost five and a half years ago,” said Mindy Mair. When she says she “hit the wheelchair,” she means that is when she needed technology to get around Vernal, where she lives.