upr-header-1.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Water line pipe break causes major damages at CAPSA facility in Logan

Capsa.jpg
capsa.org
/
CAPSA

The fire suppression pipe that busted Monday night at CAPSA flooded many of the facilities outreach offices and the children’s center, causing $50,000 - $100,000 in damages. James Boyd, CAPSA Chief Development Officer, said a large portion of the building is unusable for the next several months. He added that insurance will cover most of the damages, but they are not covered for the short-term repairs and accommodations.

“This is one of our concerns as we are trying to make sure we are prepared for the next 3-4 months of getting the building back into operation, is covering some of those short-term expenses,” said Boyd.

CAPSA already has a plan in place to ensure there are not any loss of services, Boyd said.

“So, even from our children’s center, we are moving it offsite to one of our homes to be able to provide that ongoing care.”

CAPSA services are especially crucial during the holidays. Boyd said there is increased trauma often related to the holidays when a client may have to spend time with or near an abuser. While CAPSA employees are focused on that potential situation, he said they are pivoting and sharing offices or working remotely. And, he stressed, they are still open including the crisis line.

“If you are experiencing domestic violence or sexual abuse and this holiday season especially if you need a little help. Please, please, please, call CAPSA. Despite this damage, this crisis, we are still here, and we are going to make sure you have all the support you need,” said Boyd.

Since CAPSA is still dropping off holiday gifts to clients, Boyd said one of their other current needs is gift cards or cash since they now lack their typical amount of storage space for donated items.

More information is available at capsa.org, or you can call them at 435-753-2500 during business hours.

Sheri's career in radio began at 7 years old in Los Angeles, California with a secret little radio tucked under her bed that she'd fall asleep with, while listening to The Dr. Demento Radio Show. She went on to produce the first science radio show in Utah in 1999 and has been reporting local, national and international stories ever since. After a stint as news director at KZYX on northern California's Lost Coast, she landed back at UPR in 2021.