Aimee Van Tatenhove

Science News Reporter

Aimee Van Tatenhove is a science reporter at UPR. She spends most of her time interviewing people doing interesting research in Utah and writing stories about wildlife, new technologies, and local happenings. She is also a PhD student at Utah State University, studying white pelicans in the Great Salt Lake, so she thinks about birds a lot! She also loves fishing, skiing, baking, and gardening when she has a little free time

Pixabay

Vaccine distribution in Utah began in December and January, which means many people are preparing to receive their second doses and there are many stories and rumors surrounding what that will be like.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Insects have a reputation for “bugging” us humans with their bites, stings and incessant buzzing. While we may wish they would just go away, researchers have concerns about declining “bug biomass” and how it could impact us.

Pixabay

What do tree growth, bark beetle fungi, and carbon have in common?

Roger McDonough

While winter may not seem like a prime time to see birds, February is an excellent month to view bald eagles in Utah. Aimee Van Tatenhove went birding over the weekend and reports on her experience. 

Emily Wood

This week’s speaker at the USU Ecology Center is using unique ways to study parasite communities and reduce parasite infections.

Hutchings Museum

A new mural depicting the Bear River Massacre was unveiled in Lehi over the weekend.

Zivya

Researchers in Utah have identified a rare genetic disorder in a newborn for the first time through routine newborn screening.

Wild Utah Project

Black rosy-finches are elusive alpine birds that have remained a mystery until recently. Now, researchers are using citizen science to learn more about this unusual species.

Pixabay

Each year the public is invited to count birds for the Christmas Bird Count. While some can be counted from the backyard, counting others requires a special outing.

Charles Uibel

An undeveloped island in the Great Salt Lake was donated to the state earlier this month, providing new recreation opportunities and protecting more wildlife habitat.

Aimee Van Tatenhove

With the days getting colder, getting outside can be tough. Counting birds in the name of science is a great way to spend some time outside, or just looking out your window.

Pikist

Many social issues have been on the forefront of people’s minds this year, including human trafficking and protecting children. One Cache Valley non-profit is taking a step to help those in need this holiday season.

Tadashi Fukami

Studying flowers can teach us a surprising amount about how species in ecological communities interact.

NPS/Andrew Kuhn

Wildlife in Utah face many challenges, and the newly formed Utah Wildlife Federation hopes to protect wildlife across the state.

Pixabay

Artificial intelligence may seem like something out of a science fiction movie, but it’s used in everything from ride-sharing apps to personalized online shopping suggestions.

Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

With COVID-19 pushing people to spend more time outdoors, a statewide fishing challenge saw record enrollment this year, and funds from this challenge are being used to help keep Utah trout healthy.

Online memes can be fun to share, but they can also quickly spread disinformation.

Jessica Hua

As part of Utah State University’s Ecology Center Seminars, one of the leading researchers in aquatic ecosystem pollution is coming to town virtually this week.

Pexels.com

The Carbon Free Power Project, owned by the Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS), aims to provide the region with nuclear energy by 2030. Yet, with a seventh municipality voting to leave the project last week, feelings about the initiative are mixed.

Dr. Thanh Truong

Researchers at The University of Utah created a new smartphone app that allows users to design new drugs to fight against COVID-19.

Elizabeth Materna, USFWS

To improve restoration and agricultural practices, USU scientists are studying how soil microbes and moisture affect native and nonnative plants.

Aimee Van Tatenhove

Interest in food preservation has jumped since the start of the pandemic, but so has the spread of unsafe food preservation practices and misinformation.

Three California condors on a cliff edge
wildlife.utah.gov

To reduce human threats to western birds, scientists have been exploring effects of severe fires and lead poisoning on California condors.

Joseph Wilson

Grand Staircase-Escalante is home to a rich assemblage of native bees, an often-overlooked part of Utah’s wildlife.

scfw.org

To better understand monarch declines, Utah Department of Wildlife Resources biologists have been conducting monarch surveys in Uintah county to look for monarch adults, caterpillars, and eggs.

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