Nick Porath

Mid-day host

Nicholas Porath is a Logan native and music lover.  He recently graduated from USU with a degree in broadcast journalism.  It was while studying journalism that he found his niche and newfound love for radio.  He first started out as an intern behind the scenes and found his way to the control room where he now hosts Here & Now on Monday through Friday from 11-1. Nick is also the producer for DEBUNKED. 

There is much that can be done now to get a jump start on the growing season. These tips with links from the Utah State University Extension Gardeners Almanac can help you get started.

Though it’s February and relationships are on people’s minds, it doesn’t have to be Valentine’s Day to consider ways to strengthen your relationship with your partner. Consider these six tips to help keep the spark going all year.

Todd Trapani

This month we are debunking the myth "once a junkie, always a junkie." This episode is a discussion between our host, Tim Light, and featured guests Maia Szalavitz, journalist and best-selling author of "Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction," and Savannah Eley, Opioid Prevention Specialist for Southeastern Utah Health Department. 

raisingchildren.net.au

This episode is hosted by Tim Light, and our featured guests include Carlos Riveria, Co-Founder & CEO of Generation Red Road; Dr. Lisa Schainker, USU Extension Assistant Profession, Home and Community; Dr. Amy Khan, Executive Medical Director for Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah; and Julie Flood, Smart Recovery Group Facilitator. Join us for a discussion that affects households everywhere, and hear experts explain the negative impacts of adding stereotyping to an already unfortunate and stressful situation.In this episode, we debunk the myth and correct the damaging stereotype that "kids who use drugs have bad parents."

Mauricio Mascaro, Pexels

Episode 12 of DEBUNKED raises awareness of other substances that can cause use disorder and overdose, and Debunks the myth that “only people who use opioids are at risk of overdose."

The top of a white police car with lights flashing blue.
Pixabay

Episode 11 of DEBUNKED defines harm reduction efforts surrounding substance use disorder and debunks the myth that “harm reduction practices increase crime and drug use in my community." This episode is hosted by Tim Light, who is joined by Heather Bush, Utah Department of Health Syringe Exchange Program Coordinator and Michelle Chapoose, Tribal Liaison and Coordinator of the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah. Our guests discuss science-based harm reduction statistics, common fears about harm reduction, and how understanding the variety of substance use disorder treatment options can help reduce the stigma that plagues substance users and interferes with public safety.

If you would like information about Naloxone training or are in need of Narcan, please contact Debunked through Facebook at facebook.com/debunkedpod.

Pixabay

In episode ten, we discuss another culturally-sensitive myth by debunking the idea that “all Native Americans do is drink, gamble, and take money from the government.” This episode is hosted by Tim Light and co-hosted by Michelle Chapoose, Tribal Liaison and Coordinator of the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative's Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah. 

Five smiling teenagers sitting on a bench.
Naassom Azevedo, Unsplash

In episode nine, we are Debunking the myth “Not my kids.” Our host, Tim Light, welcomes co-host Dr. Stacey MacArthur, Utah State University Extension 4-H and Youth Programs; Tim Keady, USU Extension Assistant Professor of Health & Wellness and HEART Initiative team member; Charla Bocchicchio, author of My New Normal: A Mother's Story of the Opioid Epidemic; and Gabriel Glissmeyer, USU Masters degree student who has experienced life as the sibling of a substance user. 

Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

 

In episode eight, we are debunking the myth “Methadone or suboxone are no different than heroin.” Our host, Tim Light, welcomes co-host Savannah Eley, Opioid Prevention Specialist with Southeastern Utah Health Department; Dr. Lauren Prest of Moab Regional Hospital; Garth Mullins from the Crackdown podcast; and Dr. Erin Madden, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences at Wayne State University. The group discusses the science of and the stigma associated with MAT options used to treat opioid use disorder.

 

Donald Tong, Pexels

In episode seven, we are debunking the myth "The only legitimate treatment for addiction is abstinence."

In episode six, we are debunking the myth “Native Americans have a predisposition to addiction.”

USU Extension

Mental wellness at work is an essential part of overall well-being that is often overlooked. Any job can be stressful, even if you love what you do.

USU Extension


As individuals and families come to Utah State University’s Student Nutrition Access Center (SNAC) to meet their food needs in the coming weeks, they will get to enjoy the fruits of the labors of other USU students and community volunteers.

USU Extension

Utah State University Extension 4-H youth have answered the call to help protect health care workers in rural Utah areas. 

 

USU Extension

Stress can be brought on by everyday hassles, but especially when there are larger issues like the ongoing public health concern of a pandemic. While no one’s life is completely stress free, regular negative stress can keep us from feeling and performing our best; therefore, it is important that we learn how to manage it. 

Ask An Expert: Five Tips To Avoid Coronavirus Scams

May 20, 2020
USU Extension

Not surprisingly, scammers are taking advantage of the fears that surround the Coronavirus. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission has already communicated with several scammers who are selling phony Coronavirus “treatments.” Scammers have set up websites to sell bogus products using fake emails, texts and social media posts as a method to get victims’ money and personal information.

Ask An Expert: Should You Raise Chickens?

May 20, 2020
USU Extension

In difficult economic times, many people consider purchasing chickens as part of their domestic safety net. Raising chickens, however, is distinctly different than stocking up on food storage or bottled water.

In episode five, we are debunking the myth “Addiction can be cured if you have enough willpower.”

Our host, Tim Light, welcomes guests Michelle Chapoose, the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative Tribal Liaison Coordinator from the Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah, Dr. Patrick Green, from Bonneville Family Practice in Tooele, Utah, and Adam Baxter from the Tooele County Chapter of Young People in Recovery, to discuss the science of addiction, barriers and opportunities along the journey of recovery.

 

Gustavo Fring, Pexels

This episode is a special follow-up to the March 19, coronavirus special. In this episode we focus on debunking the myth, "Only elderly and immunocompromised individuals are at risk of adverse outcomes from COVID-19." 

It features guests Michelle Chapoose, TRIO Tribal Liasion Coordinator from the Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah; Dr. Nathan Allen, ER Physician in Montana; and Paul Harkin, Director of Harm Reduction at Health Right 360 in San Francisco.

 

On this special coronavirus-themed episode of 'Debunked' our hosts will be looking at myths related to COVID-19.

Anemone123, pixabay.com

Our second episode focuses on debunking the myth that "good people like me don't become addicted to drugs." It features guest Michelle Chapoose who is a member of the Tribal and Rural Opoid Innative and the tribal liaison coordinator from the Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah; Dr. Christina A. Porucznik, an associate professor and associate division chief for education in the division of public health; and Jay Hymas of Clear Recovery Cache Valley.   

This first episode introduces the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative, and the state of the opioid crisis in Utah. It features guest Heather Bush from Utah Department of Health, a Syringe Exchange Program Coordinator and Dr. Erin Fanning Madden, assistant professor in the Division of Epidemiology and biostatistics at University of New Mexico Health Science Center.   We review information about how the crisis began, and set the stage for debunking a myth in each of our episodes moving forward.