Shannon Bond

A bipartisan group of state attorneys general is investigating how Instagram attracts and potentially harms children and young adults.

The probe follows revelations from a whistleblower about how Instagram's parent company Meta, formerly known as Facebook, has studied the risks of the photo-sharing app to its youngest users, including exacerbating body image issues for some teenage girls.

Sean Buchan has started every day of the past two weeks at his computer, tracking narratives about the COP26 U.N. climate summit.

He looks for claims like one about the electric cars ferrying dignitaries around Glasgow being powered by diesel generators. That isn't true: the cars were recharged by generators burning lower-emission vegetable oil.

The parent company of Facebook will no longer let advertisers target people based on how interested the social network thinks they are in "sensitive" topics including health, race and ethnicity, political affiliation, religion and sexual orientation.

Meta, which makes most of its $86 billion in annual sales from advertising, said it's making the "difficult decision" in an effort to stop advertisers from using ad targeting to discriminate against or otherwise harm users.

The parent company of Facebook and Instagram has released data for the first time showing how often people see bullying or harassing posts on its apps, amid scrutiny over how its social networks may be harming users and society at large.

Updated October 28, 2021 at 3:30 PM ET

Facebook's new corporate name is Meta, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced on Thursday, in an apparent effort to recast the company's public image from battered social network to tech innovator focused on building the next generation of online interaction, known as the "metaverse."

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Updated October 5, 2021 at 12:09 PM ET

A former Facebook product manager told Congress on Tuesday that the company's products harm children and stoke division, while Facebook executives hide research about the social network's risks to keep its business humming.

Frances Haugen, speaking to the Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, said Facebook needs to be subject to the same kind of government regulation that covers Big Tobacco, automobiles and opioids as public safety concerns.

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 (en español: 888-628-9454; deaf and hard of hearing: 800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.

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Facebook faces a Senate committee today as it pauses plans to build a version of Instagram aimed at kids 10 to 12 years old. It's the latest in a long list of public crises for the company, which, we should note, is a financial supporter of NPR.

More and more employers are ordering workers to get vaccinated against COVID-19 without the option of getting tested instead. Now workers are pushing back.

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are pressing Facebook to abandon its plans to build a version of its Instagram app for kids and demanding the company share research into how Instagram affects teenage users.

Updated September 9, 2021 at 4:44 PM ET

Amazon is under pressure from Democrats in Congress over how its algorithms promote hoax COVID-19 cures, including the livestock dewormer ivermectin, as well as anti-vaccination claims and other medical misinformation.

French film star Jean-Paul Belmondo, whose breakout role in the New Wave classic Breathless won him international fame, has died at age 88.

French President Emmanuel Macron mourned the passing of a man he called "a national treasure" on Twitter. "He will forever remain Le Magnifique," Macron wrote, nodding to a 1973 slapstick spy satire that was just one on a long list of star turns in a career that spanned six decades.

Hollywood's newest superhero is saving the day on-screen — and off.

The Marvel epic Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings rang up an estimated $71.4 million at U.S. theaters between Friday and Sunday, according to tracking website Box Office Mojo.

Ride-hailing apps Lyft and Uber said they will cover all the legal fees of any of their drivers who are sued under Texas's restrictive new abortion law.

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Updated August 19, 2021 at 12:54 PM ET

The Federal Trade Commission is taking another swing at Facebook after a judge tossed out its initial effort in June, with a new complaint accusing the social media giant of illegally maintaining a monopoly by squelching competitors.

What do people see most on Facebook? Recipes, cute cat GIFs or highly charged political partisanship?

That question has been hard to answer, because the social network keeps a tight lid on so much of its data.

Now, Facebook is for the first time making public some information on what content gets the most views every quarter as the company pushes back against claims its platform is dominated by inflammatory, highly partisan and even misleading posts.

Facebook has blocked a team of New York University researchers studying political ads and COVID-19 misinformation from accessing its site, a move that critics say is meant to silence research that makes the company look bad.

The researchers at the NYU Ad Observatory launched a tool last year to collect data about the political ads people see on Facebook. Around 16,000 people have installed the browser extension. It enables them to share data with the researchers about which ads the users are shown and why those ads were targeted at them.

Angela McNamara's first hint that her Facebook account had been hacked was an early-morning email warning that someone was trying to log into her account.

Updated July 27, 2021 at 12:48 PM ET

Instagram is introducing new safety settings for young users: It's making new accounts private by default for kids under 16, blocking some adults from interacting with teens on its platform, and restricting how advertisers can target teenagers.

Updated July 22, 2021 at 3:59 PM ET

Democratic senators introduced a bill on Thursday that would hold Facebook, YouTube and other social media companies responsible for the proliferation of falsehoods about vaccines, fake cures and other harmful health-related claims on their sites.

Not even a month into her role leading one of the country's most powerful regulatory watchdogs, the new head of the Federal Trade Commission Lina Khan faces her first big challenges: A federal judge on Monday gave the FTC 30 days to rewrite a blockbuster antitrust lawsuit against Facebook, after ruling that the commission had failed to make its ca

Updated June 28, 2021 at 5:31 PM ET

A federal judge has dismissed two blockbuster antitrust complaints against Facebook, in a setback to federal and state prosecutors who were pushing for a break-up of the social media giant.

During the pandemic, Reesha Howard got hooked on doing live audio chats from her smartphone. First she used Clubhouse, the buzzy, invitation-only app that surged in popularity last year with freewheeling conversations, game shows and celebrity appearances.

MUMBAI AND SAN FRANCISCO — One night last month, police crowded into the lobby of Twitter's offices in India's capital New Delhi. They were from an elite squad that normally investigates terrorism and organized crime, and said they were trying to deliver a notice alerting Twitter to misinformation allegedly tweeted by opposition politicians.

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Facebook suspended Donald Trump after his supporters attacked the U.S. Capitol on January 6. Now Facebook's rolling out new rules for all politicians and says under those rules, Trump can't come back for at least two years.

Updated June 4, 2021 at 4:43 PM ET

Facebook has extended former President Donald Trump's suspension for two years and says it will only reinstate him "if the risk to public safety has receded."

A group of Democratic senators is urging Google parent company Alphabet to investigate how its products and policies may be harming Black people.

In a letter to the tech giant's CEO, Sundar Pichai, and other executives, Sens. Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, Mark Warner of Virginia, Ed Markey of Massachusetts and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut said they worried about bias and discrimination, both in the products Google makes and the way it's handled workplace diversity.

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