Archaeology

Joschua Knüppe

We’re talking about an ancient ancestor of modern anchovies, a fearsome fish that swam the seas about 55 million years ago — and, like so many other ancient creatures, it was a lot scarier back then that it is now.

WSU Insider

Bill Lipe is professor emeritus of anthropology at Washington State University. He has spent much of his more than 50 year career in Utah archaeology beginning with the archaeological salvage of Glen Canyon before the dam construction and on into Cedar Mesa where he became a leading scholar in the early Basketmaker agricultural societies of southeastern Utah. Dr. Lipe began his work at a time when there was little federal legislation protecting archaeology or guiding preservation efforts.

The Rocky Mountain Anthropological Conference is happening today through Saturday in Logan and will cover such topics as Japanese Railroad Worker Archaeology in Central Utah and Historic Filming Locations of Utah.

WSU Insider

Bill Lipe is professor emeritus of anthropology at Washington State University. He has spent much of his more than 50 year career in Utah archaeology beginning with the archaeological salvage of Glen Canyon before the dam construction and on into Cedar Mesa where he became a leading scholar in the early Basketmaker agricultural societies of southeastern Utah. Dr. Lipe began his work at a time when there was little federal legislation protecting archaeology or guiding preservation efforts.

Bob Hubner / WSU

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about biofuels ... and tattoos. 

We're introducing an archaeologist and a chemical engineer, and if that doesn't already sound like a strange pairing, just consider what these guys study. 

Shannon Tushingham / Washington State University

This week on UnDisciplined, we talked to a researcher whose discoveries have changed the way we understand the history of tobacco in North America. Then we chatted with a scientist who is trying to change the way we think about cryptocurrencies. 

Alan Levine / Flickr

Each week on UnDisciplined, we bring two researchers together to talk about their recent work. 

This week, we're joined first by Karen Lloyd, whose research suggests microbial dark matter may be all around us. Then, we talked to Jacob Freeman, who uses trash to study the synchronous rise and fall of societies. 

BLM keeps Utah staffers from archaeology conference
regionalstudies.org

The federal Bureau of Land Management reportedly blocked at least 14 staff archaeologists — including some specialists from Utah — from attending a conference of the Society for American Archaeology in Washington, D.C. over cost concerns

The staffers were scheduled to lead a symposium entitled "Tough Issues in Land Management Archaeology."

Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance

The Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance organization has released a statewide video focusing on a chaining plan, a practice the alliance describes as destructive, within Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.