Tom Williams

UPR Management | Program Director | Access Utah Host

tom.williams@usu.edu

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

usu.edu

Today a conversation with Sen. Brent Hill about civil discourse. Brent Hill is the Next Generation Program Director for the National Institute for Civil Discourse. He’ll be talking with Neil Abercrombie, USU Vice President for Government Relations, in an event at the David B. Haight Center on the USU campus on Monday at 4:00 p.m.

A poster for the film "Dog Valley."
IMDb

Our guest for the hour today is Chad Anderson. He has made a documentary film called Dog Valley which tells the story of Gordon Church, a young gay man who was kidnapped, raped, tortured and brutally murdered in rural Utah, as well as the stories of the two men who killed him, Michael Archuleta (currently on death row) and Lance Wood (currently in a minimum security prison). The film features an interview with Wood himself and delves into true crime and the long-term effects of trauma.

Text reads, "A Marvelous Work: Reading Mormonism in West Africa" over a map of Africa.
USU Libraries

Two decades before official missionary work began, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints pamphlets, books and other church materials began circulating in West Africa, leading to a unique “native” Mormonism. Believers crafted churches from these bare materials and doctrinal interpretations during the 1960s and 1970s.

The University of Chicago Press

Throughout its history, America has been defined through maps. Whether made for military strategy or urban reform, to encourage settlement or to investigate disease, maps invest information with meaning by translating it into visual form. They capture what people knew, what they thought they knew, what they hoped for, and what they feared. As such they offer unrivaled windows onto the past.

janbrookssynergies.com

Janice Brooks, Chairwoman of the Utah Humanities Council, governing board member for Intermountain Healthcare St. George Regional Hospital and IHC Ethics Committee member, will give a keynote address to the One Utah Summit titled Leading with Creativity, Kindness and Inclusion. That speech is tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. The summit is ongoing today and tomorrow at Southern Utah University and is being streamed live at suu.edu/sutvlive.

stephentrimble.net

Stephen Trimble’s new book The Mike File is a memoir. Psychosis overwhelmed Trimble’s brother Mike at 14. Trimble’s parents had no choice but to commit Mike to the Colorado State Hospital. Mike left when Steve was six. He never lived at home again. In his new book Trimble takes readers along on Mike's heartbreaking journey, noting that Mike’s life parallels the history of our treatment of the mentally ill over the last 70 years. Stephen Trimble and Douglas Goldsmith, the former Executive Director of The Children’s Center in Salt Lake City will join us today. 

USU President Noelle Cockett, smiling.
usu.edu

Utah State University will require students attending spring semester 2022 to be vaccinated for COVID-19. Listen to our weekly interview with President Noelle Cockett to hear more.

USU College of Science

The USU College of Science is presenting a panel discussion titled “A Time to Die.” This virtual panel is tomorrow at 7:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Panelists will discuss physician-assisted dying, currently legal in a number of U.S. states, and how this practice might be implemented in Utah.

Liliana Cadena / Lockdown Essentials

In conjunction with the Moth Mainstage event coming to Logan next month, UPR and Cache Arts are presenting 15 Things Utahns Can’t Live Without in a Pandemic, which is based on NPR’s 15 Things Folks Can’t Live Without in a Pandemic. The project is about the power of storytelling, and how it can be a catharsis and a way of processing as we collectively deal with this ongoing global pandemic.

The words "Debunked Podcast" next to sound waves.
USU Department of Kinesiology and Health Science

Today we are presenting our sixth live episode of Debunked, the only Utah podcast combining evidence-based health practices with storytelling to challenge the stereotypes, and debunk the myths about harm reduction, substance use disorders and homelessness. 

HarperCollins

The economy says we must always consume more: even the slightest drop in spending leads to widespread unemployment, bankruptcy and home foreclosure.

The planet says we consume too much: in America, we burn the earth’s resources at a rate five times faster than it can regenerate. And despite efforts to “green” our consumption—by recycling, increasing energy efficiency or using solar power—we have yet to see a decline in global carbon emissions.

marioncbishop.com


It’s UPR’s Fall Member Drive. During our Spring Drive we talked with emergency room doctor, writer and UPR member Marion Bishop, who works at Cache Valley Hospital and Brigham City Community Hospital. We also talked with her last year as a part of an episode featuring frontline workers.

https://www.cacherefugees.org/

It’s a special Member Drive edition of the program again today. And today we’ll shine a spotlight on the Cache Refugee and Immigrant Connection (CRIC), an organization in northern Utah devoted to helping refugees. We’ll review the history of refugees in northern Utah as well as current needs and we’ll talk about doing good in challenging times.

music.usu.edu

Once again it's a Member Drive edition of the program. Our special guest for the hour is Craig Jessop, Music Director of the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra.

kensandersbooks.com

It’s a member drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Ken Sanders from Ken Sanders Rare Books in Salt Lake City. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite recent episodes of the program.

rememberthe43students.com

Dixie State University’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences is bringing the “Remember the 43 Students” art installation to their campus. This installation commemorates the six people who were killed and the 43 students who were “disappeared” in a night of unspeakable political violence in Iguala, Guerrero state, Mexico on September 26, 2014.

pamhouston.net

On her 120-acre homestead high in the Colorado Rockies, writer Pam Houston learns what it means to care for a piece of land and the creatures on it. Elk calves and bluebirds mark the changing seasons, winter temperatures drop to 35 below, and lightning sparks a 110,000-acre wildfire, threatening her century-old barn and all its inhabitants.

Simon & Schuster

On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’”

Simon & Schuster

The Man Who Caught the Storm is the saga of the greatest tornado chaser who ever lived: a tale of obsession and daring, and an extraordinary account of humanity’s high-stakes race to understand nature’s fiercest phenomenon.

Oxford University Press

Homesickness today is dismissed as a sign of immaturity: it's what children feel at summer camp. But in the nineteenth century it was recognized as a powerful emotion. When gold miners in California heard the tune "Home, Sweet Home," they sobbed. When Civil War soldiers became homesick, army doctors sent them home, lest they die. Such images don't fit with our national mythology, which celebrates the restless individualism of immigrants who supposedly left home and never looked back. 

danieljamesbrown.com

Daniel James Brown’s bestseller The Boys in the Boat is a story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times—the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant.

aftercredits.com


Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. We’ve lost 50% of the world’s coral in the last 30 years. Scientists say that climate change is now their greatest threat and it is estimated that only 10% can survive past 2050. In a new documentary film, “Chasing Coral,” a team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why coral are vanishing and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.

Amazon

In Eager, environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb reveals that our modern idea of what a healthy landscape looks like and how it functions is wrong, distorted by the fur trade that once trapped out millions of beavers from North America’s lakes and rivers. The consequences of losing beavers were profound: streams eroded, wetlands dried up, and species from salmon to swans lost vital habitat.

awaytogarden.com

Douglas Tallamy’s first book, “Bringing Nature Home,” awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. In this new book, Tallamy takes the next step and outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation. “Nature’s Best Hope” shows how homeowners everywhere can turn their yards into conservation corridors that provide wildlife habitats. Talllamy says that because this approach relies on the initiatives of private individuals, it is immune from the whims of government policy. Even more important, it’s practical, effective, and easy.

Kirkus Reviews

An alternative prison ranch in New Mexico conducts a daring experiment: setting the troubled residents out to retrain an aggressive herd of horses. The horses and prisoners both arrive at the ranch broken in one way or many— the horses often abandoned and suspicious, the residents, some battling drug and alcohol addiction, emotionally, physically, and financially shattered. Ginger Gaffney’s job is to retrain the untrainable. With time, the horses and residents form a profound bond, and teach each other patience, control, and trust.

courant.com


Today we feature a conversation with renowned actor and author George Takei. He is coming to Utah for the Moab Music Festival, which has commissioned a new work based on his speeches, personal writings, and recollections of his and his family’s internment in camps for Japanese Americans during World War II.

famousnews.org

Take a look at your favorite pair of jeans. Maybe you bought them on Amazon or the Gap; maybe the tag says “Made in Bangladesh” or “Made in Sri Lanka.” But do you know where they really came from, how many thousands of miles they crossed, or the number of hands who picked, spun, wove, dyed, packaged, shipped, and sold them to get to you? 

Department of Kinesiology and Health Science at Utah State University


Today we present a live episode of the Debunked Podcast. Host Tom Williams and Debunked Podcast host Don Lyons welcome Mary Jo McMillen, Executive Director of USARA (Utah Support Advocates for Recovery Awareness) and Ashanti Moritz, Outreach Director for the Skull Valley Band of Goshutes' Warrior Spirit Recovery Center to debunk the myth “indigenous and non-indigenous groups can't work together to solve social problems.”

Newsbreak

We’re going to talk about housing in Utah today. Here are some headlines from the past several months: How tight is Utah’s housing market? Some buyers offer $100K over asking; ‘Hyper-, hyper-competitive’  Salt Lake area housing market is white hot, but are Californians to blame?; What’s driving Utah’s housing crisis? It’s not what you think, says economist;  Housing affordability in Utah entering ‘perilous territory,’ study says; The pandemic has supercharged Utah’s housing market.

michaelsowder.org

A while back on Access Utah, Michael Sowder, USU professor of English and affiliated professor of religious studies, helped us learn some of the history and current practice of yoga. On Tuesday’s Access Utah he’ll lead us in an exploration of mindfulness and meditation, which may be of special interest during these times of pandemic.

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