#MeToo

Art And Literature In The #MeToo Movement

Jan 10, 2020
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The Me-Too movement has been widely seen on social media platforms as a way to empower women who have experienced sexual harassment and assault by showing survivors they are not alone. 

Art and literature have always played a big role in how people share stories and ideas with one another. The social movement “Me Too” is no exception.

Wikimedia Commons

The Utah Women’s Giving Circle’s upcoming Spring Dialogue is titled “After #MeToo: A New Frontier.” The Utah Women’s Giving Circle says that their members want “to take the awareness generated by #MeToo to drive the conversation forward into solution and a new standard, answering the question,

PLoS Blogs

  A coalition of faculty and students at USU have come together to organize a day-long discussion of sexual violence, in order to understand the issues that informed the Kavanaugh hearings and investigation. This teach-in will happen on Tuesday, October 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the USU Anthropology Museum (Old Main 252) on the USU campus.

Salt Lake Tribune

Utah leaders respond to the Senate hearings over sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Also, Prof. Anita Hill, who testified in remarkably similar hearings held 27 years ago, visits the University of Utah for a lecture on sexual harassment. And the LDS Church, House Speaker Greg Hughes and proponents of legalizing medical cannabis meet to draft medical marijuana legislation, should Proposition 2 fail in November or Gov. Gary Herbert call a special session.

christiandaily.com

The woman who says she was raped by a Missionary Training Center president sues the LDS Church and comes forward to tell her story. The state of Utah asks for control of unclaimed water in Bear Lake, prompting concerns from environmentalists about downstream effects. And how Salt Lake City's priorities for an inland port were pushed aside during this year's legislative session. 

USA Today

Last week USU’s Department of Languages Philosophy and Speech Communications hosted a panel discussion titled “Meaning and #MeToo.” Panelists discussed the #MeToo movement and provided historical, cultural, and legal analysis. On Tuesday’s Access Utah we’ll continue the discussion with the panelists: Erica Holberg, USU Assistant Professor of Philosophy; Mattie Burkert, USU Assistant Professor of English; and Nicole Vouvalis, Director of USU’s Institutional Review Board Office.

Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault

Several Utah-based organizations including the Rape Recovery Center and Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault recently hosted a town hall conversation focusing on the impact and future of the #MeToo movement. Organizers say “It is time for Utahns to come together to discuss the future of our community. To give survivors an opportunity to define what progress looks like for our community.” They hope to provide forums where the concerns of sexual assault and harassment survivors would be heard.

 

We’ll talk with panelists today, including:

CNN

The Salt Lake Tribune’s editorial voices reflect and opine on the #MeToo movementOperation Rio Grande, national monuments and the power wielded by Sen. Orrin Hatch in 2017.