Physics

Heiko Kiera / Fotalia

This week on the show, we're talking about the science behind Hurricane Dorian, a "rat-pocalypse," a new human ancestor, and poison dart frogs. Everybody on the show is an expert on something, but none of them is an expert on those things. 

KPFA

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking to a researcher who's demonstrated that some insects may actually benefit from pesticides. Then, we'll chat with a string theorist who is uncoupling ideas about the universe faster than you can say "Nikulin involution."

Phys.Org

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about how things start. 

First, we'll be joined by a physical scientist who's uncovered a secret about how water begins to freeze.

Then, we'll chat with a health scientist who will tell us about how to start a revolution in healthy behaviors.

Joining us in studio is Valeria Molinero, a professor of theoretical chemistry at the University of Utah. Her team's recent study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society explains how tiny proteins control the initial formation of ice at various temperatures that are almost never exactly 32 degrees. 

Also joining us, from Calgary, Alberta, where she is an epidemiologist whose work focuses on the role of energy balance in cancer prevention, is Lin Yang. Her team's recent work shows that despite health warnings, Americans still spend way too much time sitting.  

Laurie Sparham/Miramax Films/Reuters

What do Judi Dench and Samuel L. Jackson have to do with ending crime waves and curing blindness? We'll find out this week when we're joined by guests Elizabeth Vargis and Sherry Towers. 

White, male geologist stands next to a pip gushing water with a creek and riparian system in the background.
CA Department of Water Resources

Fluid flow is an engineering application that can be difficult to understand or visualize, but a forthcoming smartphone app will aid in visualizing fluid mechanics flow fields.

Cache Valley Daily

Kip Stephen Thorne (born June 1, 1940) is an American theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate, known for his contributions in gravitational physics and astrophysics. A longtime friend and colleague of Stephen Hawking and Carl Sagan, he was the Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) until 2009 and is one of the world's leading experts on the astrophysical implications of Einstein's general theory of relativity.

“In the scientific community his work will be recognized for a very, very long time,” Perry said. “I would imagine that in a thousand years’ time his name will still be known.”
blogs.scientificamerican.com

Scientist Stephen Hawking was known for his groundbreaking work with black holes and relativity. He passed away March 14, 2018, at the age of 76, but his legacy as a pioneer and a friend lives on. UPR’s Bronson Teichert spoke with Malcolm Perry, a professor at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and close friend of Stephen Hawking.

mkaku.org

Physicist and futurist Michio Kaku says that moving human civilization to the stars, formerly the domain of fiction, is increasingly becoming a scientific possibility–and a necessity.

Aimee Tallian

James Coburn works for the Physics Department at Utah State University. He’s the driving force behind a favorite Thanksgiving tradition, the November Physics Demo Show.

Garth Lenz


  

  Hurricane Harvey and Irma broke storm records in the U.S. A USU Physics professor who studies climate change is joining with a northern Utah string quartet to encourage public discourse about the connections between recent natural disasters and sustainability.

Physics professor, bestselling author, and dynamic storyteller James Kakalios reveals the mind-bending science behind the seemingly basic things that keep our daily lives running, from our smart phones and digital “clouds” to x-ray machines and hybrid vehicles.

Andrew Crusoe

A few months ago, gravitational waves from a black hole collision were measured by scientists, a discovery many have predicted to win the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2016. One Utah author wrote about this discovery in his science fiction novel—five years before it happened.


ligo.caltech.edu

Yesterday’s announcement of the discovery of gravitational waves, a phenomenon that Einstein predicted, but which he thought humans could never detect, rocked the scientific world.