Project Resilience

The Herald Journal, Jennifer Meyers

When Saboor Sahely came to Utah State University from Afghanistan, he was befriended by a fellow student who invited him to his home for Thanksgiving dinner.

When the pandemic hit and social distancing became the order of the day, the Westminster Bell Choir at Logan's Presbyterian Church knew it could no longer gather to rehearse in the small basement room at the church. 

Hidden behind the closed doors of a Logan home, an abusive husband locked up his wife's and children's shoes. He thought he had them trapped inside. But one night the desperate woman grabbed her two kids and fled out a back window—running away barefoot in the snow.

What do you do if you're a music major at USU and want to add your voice to the call to take action on climate change?

emcapito.com

The Fall speaker series from the Utah Women’s Giving Circle continues on Thursday with a presentation titled “Triaging Resilience in the Midst of Crisis.” The speaker, clinical therapist Em Capito, says she’ll share “a research-based tangible framework for triaging our personal resilience along with the strategic shifts that deepen our roots, for ourselves, our families and our teams, toward the collective resilience that will lead our communities into the reinvention and renewal ahead.” Em Capito will join us for Monday’s Access Utah.

Morgan Pratt

According to the Center for Disease Control, more than 90 million Americans live with a chronic disease with many of those are terminal. How does a person navigate a terminal diagnosis? Here is one story of one young adult who shares with us her mindset of hope and perseverance.

Mary Heers

In this Project Resilience vignette, UPR producer Mary Heers tells us how card playing has helped her meet new people and make connections over the years.

Courtesy of Janelle and Colton Carter

 


As part of UPR’s Project Resilience series, producer Mary Heers introduces us to a young husband and wife who are familiar with the challenges of adapting when life takes a sudden turn. 

Mary: Janelle Carter wanted to become a German teacher ever since she took her first German class in the seventh grade and was right on track. It was only supposed to be a short trip to Montana to visit her husband's family. Colton went out four wheeling with his friends. Janelle stayed home because she was four months pregnant. Then everything changed. Colton lost control of his four wheeler and hit a tree so hard it broke his back and severed his spinal cord.

Dani Hayes

Many longtime UPR listeners may remember Utah Public Radio reporter Rhesa Ledbetter. Rhesa has a PhD in biochemistry from Utah State University, is a science professor at Idaho State University, and is an award-winning storyteller. 

Women do the lion’s share of unpaid care work in Utah, spending an average of 5.6 hours a day looking after children or parents. Utah’s women in their 40s and 50s often spend time doing both child and elder care. It makes for some stressful moments in the best of times, and the pandemic adds some new challenges.

Matilyn Mortensen

“All of the things together, like being pregnant in a foreign country while mourning the loss of my brother, felt like the hardest thing I've ever done. And I've done hard things before as we all have. But for me, these were the hardest together and the timing of them and I felt so alone.”

USU Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology

Derrik Tollefson is Professor of Social Work and head of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology at Utah State University. He also directs the I-System Institute for Transdisciplinary Studies at USU.

Pexels

Our new learn-from-home courses are free, fun and available to you and your family. Classes are led by Southern Utah experts volunteering their time and talents in interactive 45-minute sessions. Learn techniques for green thumb gardening, interior decorating, making Italian cuisine and even take a virtual hike with a southern Utah geologist. 

Chao Yen,https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

As things are beginning to reopen, we want to invite visitors to experience the wonders of Utah's Canyon Country with the San Juan Strong promise to do their part to keep us and our communities healthy. 

 

Shalayne Smith Needham: We have all dealt with the effects of COVID-19 in one way or another and some of us will come out of this a new person. Joining us to discuss this is Dr. David Schram, an associate professor of human development and family studies in the College of Education at Utah State University. 

 

pixabay.com

There are many tourism opportunities right in your own backyard. They are a great way to cope during COVID-19 and a great way to become more resilient.

Project Resilience: Culturally Responsive Therapy

May 21, 2020

 

It’s no secret Utah is a majority white state. That majority holds true for mental health workers as well, and it’s part of what makes culturally responsive therapy important. 

MENTAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES NATIONAL TRAINING CENTER

 

Ah, that first year of college. It’s like this tidal wave of freedom. And pressure.

Courtesy of Barbara Abbott.

As part of the Utah Public Radio series, Project Resilience, we hear from retired Northern Utah teacher Barbara Abbott, who remembers times she would take her wayward dog Cedar Bear to work with students at Hillcrest Elementary.

Pikist

 

Shalayne Smith Needham: In stressful times, it's important to reach out to friends, family, and especially children who need guidance during these hard times. Callie Ward is an Extension assistant professor at Utah State University and specializes in family finance, family resource management, emergency preparedness and food preservation. Callie Ward joins us by phone from Garfield County. Thanks for being here. 

Cait Salinas | UPR

From social distancing to new levels of anxiety and distress, the coronavirus pandemic has rapidly transformed our lives. On Sunday morning at 10:00, tune in to UPR to hear an interfaith program featuring messages of hope tailored to this particular moment.

Tamsen Maloy

 

 

According to a 2018 study from the Urban Indian Health Institute, Utah ranks 8th in the nation for the   

number of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. Utah legislators recently formed a task force to address why Utah’s numbers are so high. But the bill is only a part of the overall work being done to address this issue. 

Courtesy of Nielsen Family

 


Being a new parent can be exhausting. 

 

Jordan: “You’d be falling asleep and you’re so tired and then you have some kind of thought of, ‘Oh, he’s in the bed with us,’ and  you forgot that you put him in his crib, so he’s in the crib, but then you’re all stressed looking through the bed trying to find him.” 

 

This isn’t breaking news, but every one of us is feeling some tension, a lot of uncertainty.

And if you are, so are your kids or, sometimes, grandkids, in the case of Vonda Jump Norman, an assistant professor of Social Work.

Utah State Today

This moment in our history is, without doubt, difficult and uncertain.

It’s also, says social worker Vonda Jump-Norman, an “unprecedented opportunity that we may never have again.”

Pick Pik

 

  

During this global pandemic, many medical decisions are having to be made about who can receive what kind of care. Disability rights activists, like Storee Powell, who works at the Center for Person’s with Disabilities at Utah State University, said many of the current policies are discriminatory. UPR’s Matilyn Mortensen spoke with Powell about why she finds these attitudes so concerning.

elevatecorperatetraining.com.au

On Tuesday’s Access Utah, as a part of UPR’s Project Resilience, we’re going to talk about how to be resilient with all that’s happening with the coronavirus pandemic, including social distancing. We’ll also talk about how all of this is impacting children and individuals with disabilities.

You may be experiencing anxiety or stress regarding all the news about COVID-19. You're not alone. Here are four simple things you can do to help keep yourself and others healthy.

Statewide Internet Safety Initiative Launches

Feb 11, 2020
Pixnio

Tuesday is Safer Internet Day and the launch of the statewide initiative, “Be Awesome Online.” The campaign has the goal of helping children and parents be safe on the internet.

Tall, orange brick apartment buildings against a blue sky.
Photo by Chris Gerber on Unsplash


A bill that would provide one million dollars in one-time funding and nearly five million dollars in ongoing funds seeks to add 30 beds to the Utah State Mental Hospital. It would also improve supports, including housing assistance, for people after they are released.  

 

Pages