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Recent study shows COVID-19 vaccine safe for children with MIS-C

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Heather Hazzan
/
Self Magazine / Creative Commons
"COVID-19 vaccination has actually been shown to be effective in preventing the development of MIS-C compared to those who have not been vaccinated,” Dr. Truong said.

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome, or MIS-C, is a life-threatening COVID-19 complication that presents in one of every 3-4,000 children infected with COVID-19 (according to the CDC), disproportionately affecting Black and Hispanic populations.

Dr. Dongngan Truong is Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Utah, and Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital and a co-author on a new study looking at the effects of the vaccine on children with MIS-C.

“It's a hyper inflammatory post-infectious response to COVID-19 infection itself, we typically see MIS-C, occurring two to six weeks after COVID-19 infection. Commonly, organ systems that are involved are the gastrointestinal system leading to symptoms like abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea. And one of the reasons why many can get critically ill is because of cardiovascular involvement,” Dr. Truong explains.

Dr. Truong discussed reticence in parents of children with MIS-C to vaccinate their children, concerned that symptoms of MIS-C would resurface. This study found children with MIS-C can safely get the COVID-19 vaccine.

“We found that kids, you know, had typical reactions after COVID-19 vaccination and luckily nothing to suggest a recurrence of MIS-C,” said Dr. Truong.

Typical reactions include things like arm soreness and fatigue. Not only are reactions to the vaccine comparable in those with MIS-C and those without, but the vaccine has shown to be effective in preventing MIS-C in post-vaccination encounters with COVID-19.

“And one thing that multiple studies within the US and in Europe have shown is that COVID-19 vaccination has actually been shown to be effective in preventing the development of MIS-C compared to those who have not been vaccinated,” Dr. Truong said.

Find the full study here.

Erin Lewis is a science reporter at Utah Public Radio and a PhD Candidate in the biology department at Utah State University. She is passionate about fostering curiosity and communicating science to the public. At USU she studies how anthropogenic disturbances are impacting wildlife, particularly the effects of tourism-induced dietary shifts in endangered Bahamian Rock Iguana populations. In her free time she enjoys reading, painting and getting outside with her dog, Hazel.