Harm Reduction


Something exciting today: a live episode of the podcast DEBUNKED which seeks to dispel harmful myths and stereotypes about people who use drugs, persons in recovery, and evidenced-based harm reduction efforts. Today we’ll debunk the myth; Native Americans only live on reservations. Our guests are: Sandy Sulzer, Director of the Office of Health Equity and Community Engagement at USU; Kristina Groves, LCSW, Ute/Hopi Tribe, Therapist at Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake; and podcast host Don Lyons.

DEBUNKED Special Feature: Harm Reduction During COVID-19

Dec 30, 2020
https://www.nursetogether.com.

“Essential services” is one of the 2020 buzzwords that it is very unlikely any of us were thinking about before the global pandemic. But in March, as COVID cases began to spread throughout the U.S. and as business and organizations began to shut down, defining what had to stay open became crucial. 


The top of a white police car with lights flashing blue.
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Episode 11 of DEBUNKED defines harm reduction efforts surrounding substance use disorder and debunks the myth that “harm reduction practices increase crime and drug use in my community." This episode is hosted by Tim Light, who is joined by Heather Bush, Utah Department of Health Syringe Exchange Program Coordinator and Michelle Chapoose, Tribal Liaison and Coordinator of the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah. Our guests discuss science-based harm reduction statistics, common fears about harm reduction, and how understanding the variety of substance use disorder treatment options can help reduce the stigma that plagues substance users and interferes with public safety.

If you would like information about Naloxone training or are in need of Narcan, please contact Debunked through Facebook at facebook.com/debunkedpod.

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In episode eight, we are debunking the myth “Methadone or suboxone are no different than heroin.” Our host, Tim Light, welcomes co-host Savannah Eley, Opioid Prevention Specialist with Southeastern Utah Health Department; Dr. Lauren Prest of Moab Regional Hospital; Garth Mullins from the Crackdown podcast; and Dr. Erin Madden, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences at Wayne State University. The group discusses the science of and the stigma associated with MAT options used to treat opioid use disorder.

 

 

Mindy Vincent started Utah’s first syringe exchange program in 2016. 

That was right after the state legalized it. 

 

“People were appalled,” said Vincent, founder of the non-profit Utah Harm Reduction Coalition. “People were like, ‘oh my gosh, you’re gonna do what? You’re gonna enable drug use. What kind of craziness is this?’” 

Donald Tong, Pexels

In episode seven, we are debunking the myth "The only legitimate treatment for addiction is abstinence."